Tag Archives: virus

DNA snippets for virus communications

Some of the greatest scientific discoveries have been accidental. To that list, Israeli scientists have added one more. They’ve discovered for the first time an instance of viruses leaving messages for other viruses. What makes the discovery remarkable is that scientists expect such communication systems to exist among other kinds of viruses. If true, we’ll…

via Scientists have caught viruses talking to each other—and that could be the key to a new age of anti-viral drugs — Quartz

This is quite astounding. Not quite the equivalent of dogs leaving scent markers so other dogs will know they’ve been there, but a form of communication nonetheless. From a virus. And there’s a good chance other viruses use a similar method to communicate as well. More amazing ‘accidents’. 😀


Why the Computer Viruses is Created?

Still on the theme of computer security, here’s some very well explained info. on computer viruses etc., and how they work. The info. on the ‘zombie’ network should give everyone pause for thought. I won’t say ‘enjoy’, but I hope you learn something that will make you safer in the future. Meeks.

 

As a computer technician, my clients frequently ask me “Why the computer viruses are created?”, especially after I have been called out to remove a virus from their computer. This is what I tell th…

Source: Why the Computer Viruses is Created?


Possible new #email #scam ?

I’m not a programmer so I’m just guessing that the two emails below are scams, but whatever they are, any change of pattern deserves caution.

So what are these changes of pattern?

I’ve noticed two, and they both involve the email address of the sender. Before I show you what I mean, it’s worth having a quick look at the standard parts or components of an email address. I’ll use my gmail address [this is my public email only] to illustrate:

meekasmind@gmail.com

The components are as follows:

  1. the username – i.e. meekasmind
  2. the @ symbol
  3. the mail server – i.e. gmail
  4. the top level doman or extension – i.e.  .com

The @ symbol never varies but the username could be just about anything, same with the mail server, however the top level doman is usually restricted to a few familiar extensions. These include:

  • .com
  • .org
  • .net
  • .info

I’m sure there are more, but those are the main ones, off the top of my head. Outside of the US, these extensions often include the country code – e.g. .com.au for Australia.

Now have a look at the screenshots of emails I received just this week:

security scam concert-tickets

This is the first one I received. Note the .stream extension. Now it is possible that new extensions were approved while I wasn’t looking, but when I searched for the ‘concert-tickets‘ mail server from which the email supposedly came, I found nothing. Zip, zero, nada.

The next day I received three more emails with the hypenated mail server name and the .stream extension. Hmm..a pattern emerging here.

Then today a variation on the theme:

security scam or hack 2

Instead of a .stream extension on the email address, we now have a .download. Assuming the .download and .stream extensions are legitimate, just exactly how many of these extensions are there?

Note something else as well. Under ‘Improve Your Vision’ [which is a link to another web location] there is vertical line. That line is not a truncated picture holder [given that Firefox blocked the images embedded in the body of the email*]. Nor is it an error. That line is another link.

Why is that line potentially significant?

Because even people who know to be wary of links in emails might click it just to find out what it is.

For me, another suspicious thing is the lack of ‘other’ information in any of these emails. Now it’s possible that the blocked images contain more information – i.e. text – but as a form of marketing, this doesn’t seem to be very smart. Which leads me to suspect that it’s not really marketing at all.

If anyone knows anything about these ‘new’ extensions – i.e. whether they are legitimate or not – please reply in comments. Until we know for sure, however, please treat these kinds of emails as potentially dangerous.

cheers

Meeks

*The reason Firefox blocks at least some images in emails is that certain images ‘can’ contain malicious code. I’m not sure how that works, and I’m not sure how often it happens, but I know it’s a possibility.


What I always wanted – a Russian bride?

I’ve been getting an awful lot of phishing emails lately, but this one really tickled my funny bone

phishing russian brides

I used to imagine that some sweatshop hacker sat hunched over a keyboard somewhere, grinning maniacally as he/she sent out another virus laden email. But I suspect the reality is more like :

1. Unsuspecting Netizen enters his/her email address somewhere,

2. Said email address is tacked onto some database of addresses,

3. Said database is sold to malware distributors who then activate a program that sends out a hook email to every address in the database,

4. Neither the program nor the malware distributor care whether the hook is going to be ‘plausible’ to most addressees – e.g. why would I have signed up to digitally date women? [No offence to gay ladies!]

5. The rationale of these mass mailings is that out of all those millions, one or two will bite. They are the real targets. They will click on the link, their pc’s will become infected and the cycle of digital infection continues.

Anyway, that was not the post I meant to write, but who can resist a Russian bride?

cheers

Meeks


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