Tag Archives: trailer-music

Say hello to Max Legend!

In case there was any doubt, I’m in love with a new composer, and his name is Max Legend! Raw, driving, powerful yet lyric, ML’s music is not gentle. It doesn’t yearn, it stirs…no, it doesn’t just stir, it kicks arse. And that is the exact feel I’ve been looking for all summer.

Many writers use music to set the mood for their storytelling, but for me, music is not an optional extra, it’s a necessity. And not just any music. It has to be the right kind of music for the story I want to tell. Without it, I write words, but they’re not connected to my heart. Does that make any sense?

Yes? No? Maybe? This is why I dislike writing about the writing process. Every writer is different so something that makes sense to one person may make no sense at all to another. For me, music acts like a portal that carries me straight past the logic centres of my brain to the weird, messy, parts.

But the right music doesn’t just take me to my ‘creative side’. It also helps to translate all those messy, nebulous thoughts and feelings into a linear progression of words that end up telling a story.

No two people will ever experience a story the same way, and no two people will ever respond to a piece of music the same way. But sometimes, if I get it right, they may share a feeling, for a little while. To me, that’s what real communication is all about.

So…I’ve finally found my way into the next story. I won’t publish excerpts on the blog because I’ve learned not to make anything public until its well and truly done. But I will post the odd bit of music, and for the forseeable future it will all be from the brilliant mind of Max Legend. πŸ™‚

cheers

Meeks

p.s. ML is another composer who writes for trailers, games and movies.

 

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High C’s – from Vanquish #TSFH

This is my next favourite trach from the new Two Steps From Hell album – Vanquish. It’s called High C’s, and it hits them, effortlessly. πŸ˜€

Music to make me smile. πŸ™‚

-hugs-

Meeks


New #Music from Two Steps From Hell -dance-

What a great way to start the day. This is ‘Enchantress’ :

As I discover more new ‘favourite’ tracks I’ll post them.

Good morning, World πŸ™‚

Meeks


Trailer Music – the sneaky classics [1]

I’ve loved classical music all my life, and still do, but nowadays the music I listen to is all so-called Trailer Music. According to the entry in Wikipedia, Trailer Music is defined as:

‘…music [is] to complement, support and integrate the sales messaging of the mini-movie that is a film trailer.’

A little further down that Wiki article, you’ll find a list of Trailer Music production companies. Included in that list are three of my favourites:

  • Jo Blankenburg,
  • Two Steps From Hell, and
  • Audiomachine.

Those three also feature in my Innerscape music giveaway competition. You can find the list of composers and music in the FAQ here. But my love affair with Trailer Music did not begin with movies, it began with games.

Video games have always come with soundtracks and sound effects, but in some games, the music is more than good enough to stand on its own. Nobuo Uematsu is famous amongst gamers as the composer behind the Final Fantasy video game series, and that is where I became a fan too – playing Final Fantasy 7, 8, 9 and 10.

Nevertheless, I did not become a devotee until I played Vagrant Story [another Square video game] and discovered the music of Hitoshi Sakimoto. The video clip is called Truth and it sets the mood for a particular part of the game story:

 

I have owned the soundtrack of Vagrant Story for over 16 years, and I still play it. In fact, it was and is one of my favourite pieces of music, ever.

Another firm favourite is the soundtrack from Final Fantasy XI [the MMO]. Bastok was my ‘home’ on the game, and I still adore the theme that went with it:

Believe it or not, I still get a happy feeling listening to this theme, and a part of me wishes I could go back. Anyway, this track and another favourite – the theme for Gustaberg – were both composed by Kumi Tanioka a lady composer. πŸ™‚

Do you notice a curious pattern emerging here?

Those themes do not necessarily come with ‘mini-movies’, but they do evoke a digital place and time. When I listen to them, I can see the city of Bastok, I can see the road leading to Gustaberg. Pretty amazing given that I haven’t played FFXI in well over ten years. Even more amazing is that I’m not alone. The theme for Bastok has had over 47,000 views on Youtube.

And on that note I’ll have to stop and go to work. I’ll continue this discussion of sneaky classics in the next post.

cheers

Meeks

 


#Audiomachine – An Unfinished Life

Music has always played a huge role in my writing, setting the mood and acting as a conduit for the emotions of the story, so it has to be something I can listen to for weeks and months at a time – literally, the same music, on repeat, for hours per day.

For Vokhtah, this creative soundtrack was provided by Two Steps From Hell [TSFH]. For Innerscape, however, I needed something more emotional, and dare I say it, romantic. Enter German composer Jo Blankenburg. His four albums – Elysium, Vendetta, Floatovations and Feather Dance – have been woven into the fabric of Innerscape since its conception in 2012.

But what do you do when the music you have been listening to for so long stops taking you to ‘that place’? You go looking for new music, that’s what.

As luck would have it, I did find some stunning new music by Jo Blankenburg, but there was a catch – as it hasn’t been released yet, the only way I can listen to it is by streaming it from SoundCloud.

Now don’t get me wrong, SoundCloud is a lot of fun, but when you have a 60 GB download limit per month, it’s not quite cost effective.

-avoids looking at the Offspring-

As a result, I’ve had to ration my music, and that is not conducive to creativity.

But I digress. While putting together my SoundCloud playlist, I stumbled on the playlists of other people with similar tastes and thanks to one of them, I discovered Audiomachine’s Guardian at the Gate, which eventually led to their Tree of Life album.

Those of you who have seen The Hobbit may find the tracks familiar. As I haven’t seen The Hobbit it was all new to me, but the track, ‘An Unfinished Life’, grabbed me by the gut and hasn’t let go :

The reason I’m making such a big deal about this is that I’d actually heard Audiomachine before… and didn’t like their music all that much. The tracks were all big and epic, much like Two Steps From Hell, but without that lyrical quality that TSFH’s Thomas Bergersen brings to all his music. So imagine my surprise at discovering this lovely, emotional, soft side to Audiomachine?

The actual composer responsible for Audiomachine’s Tree of Life album is Danail Getz. Finding information about him has been surprisingly hard, but apparently he was born in Bulgaria, studied music there and did so well he was offered a scholarship to the US. From there he progressed to movie soundtracks before finally turning to trailer music.

I guess that’s where Audiomachine comes in because it’s not a band, its a company and as such, it probably ‘out-sources’ to composers like Getz as the need requires.

It’s kind of an odd way of creating music, but I’m not complaining; I have new writing music, I’ve discovered a new composer and hopefully some time in 2016, Jo Blankenburg will bring out a new album featuring the tracks I want to hear. Life’s good. πŸ™‚

cheers

Meeks

 

 

 


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