Tag Archives: sensors

Eyesight & Oculus Rift

As an old[er] gamer with dodgy eyesight, I’ve been worried that I’d never be able to play VR [virtual reality] games. Well, yesterday I learned that I can. 😀

But first things first: what is Oculus Rift? Basically, it’s a very expensive piece of headgear that makes it possible to view imaginary things as if they were real. The model I tried out yesterday looks like this:

As well as the goggles and inbuilt headphones, the Oculus Rift comes with two handsets that transmit Wifi data to the two ‘receiver’ units positioned in front of the ‘player’.

All of this hardware is controlled by specialist software running on a fairly powerful pc. Without getting too technical, the software sends two, separate, high resolution images to the lens inside the headset. The appropriate image then bounces through one of the lens and into the left or right eye.

To get an idea of how this works, close one eye and look at an object. Close both eyes and move a few inches to the left. Now open the other eye and look at the object again. The object hasn’t changed at all, but the viewing angle has – i.e. you’re seeing a part of the object you haven’t seen before. Put the two images together, and you get a 3D image.

The human brain interprets these separate images all the time using a process called ‘stereopsis‘. But for some individuals, stereopsis doesn’t develop as it should. The brain still gets streams of images from both eyes, but these individuals see depth using a process called ‘motion parallax‘.

I am one of these individuals, and that’s why I worried I wouldn’t be able to see in VR. But I can! I can. My spatial awareness expanded right out, and when a bunch of very large robots suddenly turned feral and loomed over me, I instinctively threw my hands up to protect my head! I also squeaked in fear, but the less said about that the better. 😀

This is a video of a bunch of older people experiencing VR for the first time:

The headset shown in the video clip is the VIVE rather than the Oculus Rift, but the experience is much the same.

I wasn’t wearing glasses when I tried out the Rift, but apparently you can fit your normal glasses inside the goggles by adjusting the fit.

And now a word or two about the quality of the graphics. I wasn’t wearing any of my glasses [I have 3, one each for long, mid-range and close viewing] and that may have made the graphics less than optimal. Or it may be that the graphics still need to be improved. Or perhaps you simply need bleeding edge computer hardware to get the best results. Whatever the reason, I was in no danger of mistaking computer generated graphics for the real thing. But…the sensation of depth really does trick the brain into believing the images are real. One day, we may not be able to perceive the difference at all.

Finally, some unpleasant aspects of the hardware. For starters, the goggles are heavy. Whilst you’re ‘inside’, you tend to forget about the weight because there’s so much there to distract you, but it does feel a bit like carrying half a brick around on your head. It’s also hot. Yesterday was only warm, but after ten minutes playing with the Rift, my hair was wet with sweat.

A big part of the weight of the Rift comes from the glass lenses that make the magic possible. Given how young the technology is, I suspect the mechanics will be improved rapidly. One improvement I would very much like to see is in the handsets. Although they are far more intuitive than the controllers used with consoles, they’re still clunky. Gloves and a full-body suit with embedded sensors would be miles better. They’d also be miles more expensive, but hopefully the price will come down by the time I can afford to buy one. 😉

All in all, I loved my taste of VR, and now that I know I can see despite the issues with my eyesight, I’m determined to own my own setup…one day.

cheers

Meeks


Yes…but why bother?

This is not one of my stereotypical technology posts because instead of exciting me, it simply makes me uneasy. Before I explain why, have a look at this video clip. Go on, it won’t take long:

You can also read the article that goes with the video here:

https://futurism.com/smart-walls/

Now, here’s the thing. I can see the wall sensors becoming a part of the building process, just like light switches and plumbing, but I must have missed the bit that says why you would want to have them in your wall in the first place?

I mean, yes, walls probably should be multipurpose, but aren’t they already?

I don’t have a single wall that’s ‘naked’. I like putting up prints, clocks, the odd real painting to personalise my space. In fact, that’s one of the big disadvantages of renting – you can’t do any of that in case you damage the walls.

Nevertheless, assuming there are naked walls that should be doing something other than forming rooms, I can’t think of a single good reason to have sensors track me from room to room?

“Mum! Where are you?”

Okay, that’s a possibility, but do you really want the wall monitor to display a pixelated image of you sitting on the loo?

To be fair, I suspect the engineers who put this video clip together probably haven’t gotten past the point of making wall angels with their invention. They are probably just in love with the idea that they can put sensors in the walls. In fact, they probably haven’t given much thought to what actual problem the sensors are supposed to solve. But…

If these sensors have to phone home to Amazon, or Google or some other giant tech company to do their smart processing, then this invention goes beyond “gee whiz, look how much fun this is” to “bloody hell, I can’t even have any privacy in my own home????”

I love tech, but only when I own and control it…all of it. My home is my castle, and I don’t want an internet-of-things spying on me. Ever.

Meeks


Coal to Newcastle or #robots to #China UPDATE 18/4/2017

I was going to post a recipe for plum cake, but then I found this video clip on Quartz. What can I say? I like robots. 🙂

So, this from China:

And this from…?

But I saved the best till last – the Teslasuit. It’s a full body haptic suit. For gamers to wear in conjunction with a VR headset.

The Teslasuit doesn’t exist…yet…but there’s a Kickstarter campaign to turn it into reality. 

Apologies, I was wrong – the Teslasuit does already exist and it’s being enhanced by its developers. This is what the still image looks like:

And these are two video clips that show it actually working:

There is also another video clip but you need Flash to play it and I don’t use Flash anymore. But for those that do, here it is:

http://www.bbc.com/specialfeatures/horizonsbusiness/seriessix/sharper-senses/?vid=p03xnpch

And finally, you can go to the website for even more information :

https://teslasuit.io/#intro

I am seriously excited!

Meeks


#VR – Virtual reality – ‘suit’

In Innerscape, I imagined an immersion ‘tank’ as the the technology for the top end of virtual reality gaming, but this suit is miles better. And its technology is perhaps five years away, not 80 plus.

If you don’t want to watch the video, have a look at this article from Gizmag:

http://www.gizmag.com/axonvr-virtual-reality-suit/43179/

More and more, I’m realising that the future is now. Heaven only knows what the real future will bring!

cheers

Meeks


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