Tag Archives: Microsoft

Office #Word 2016 really is a piece of…

Shyte.

What follows is a raged induced rant so look away now.

-breathe-

I’ve just wasted an hour trying to fix the Word 2016 dictionary. It started with ‘Mira Than‘.

No, actually, it started with the combination of two big episodes of Innerscape into one very BIG Word 16 document. How big? 375 pages. Apparently, Word still has issues with very big files. That’s the reason I originally migrated my writing to a dedicated writing package [StoryBox]. Unfortunately, to publish a print version of Innerscape, I have to go Word >>PDF>>Createspace.

Anyway, after spending hours wrestling with Word’s section breaks [more on that in another post], I began doing a this-is-absolutely-the-last edit, when I realised that every time I typed in Miira Tahn, Word would ‘correct’ it to ‘Mira Than’ as soon as my attention moved elsewhere.

I tried getting Word to ‘Ignore All’, but it wouldn’t – and no, it wasn’t just variations on the name, like ‘Miira Tahn‘s‘ etc. And then it began throwing up other ‘errors’, all to do with US spelling. So, naturally, I used the nifty option at the bottom of the Spell Check pane to change the dictionary back to UK spelling:

My efforts obviously confused Word because it suddenly switched to the French dictionary. -growls in rage-

The French dictionary finds every word written in English to be incorrect…

I changed the dictionary back to English UK.

Nope…Word now wants to stay in French.

I look up fixes to the problem. I attempt to reset my language preferences. I restart Word…

Now Word wants to use the US dictionary again BUT the page full of French ‘errors’ is still set to the French dictionary. And then Word stopped working.

It’s back now, but I haven’t been game to check my document in case I end up throwing the monitor across the room. There are many basic, useful formatting functions in Word, and it works well for short-ish, business type documents, but the more Microsoft tries to automate the process, the more mangled and unstable it becomes. Especially with big documents.

I hate to think how convoluted the Word code must be because Microsoft almost never delete anything. They just keep adding to it, and adding to it, and adding to it…

Sadly, while this rant did make me feel a little less homicidal, it’s only a temporary distraction from the main event. I have to get this stupid piece of shit to play nice or I may never get my hands on those lovely, shiny books. 😦

Thanks for letting me vent,

Meeks

 

 

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Sci-fi now with Holo Lens and Actiongram

In a previous post I talked about holograms as a thing of the near future. I was wrong, they’re here now. Watch the video below to see how Microsoft’s Holo Lens is being teamed with Actiongram to create sci-fi right now:

If that video clip is anything to go by, the interface is still in its infancy, but given the speed with which things like 3D printers have become mainstream, I expect real life holograms to become an everyday reality within five years…and that may be a conservative estimate.

One thing I am sure of is that hologram technology will change how we work, rest and play. I wonder how much money I have in my piggy bank….

Meeks

 


Microsoft’s Hololens – is it the precursor of the ‘chrono’?

The idea of holograms has been around for a very long time, but the only common usage I am aware of is in those images that display a sort of 3D view when you move the image one way or the other. But that, like exoskeletons, is all about to change.

“One of the biggest developments, and we should see it in the next twelve months, is Microsoft’s HoloLens,” says Mark Pesce, a Sydney-based futurist.

HoloLens is a wearable visor which projects holographic images and videos into the line of sight of the user. While it will be great for gaming, Pesce also thinks it will have a huge application in the workplace.

“Microsoft has linked it to Windows 10, and we should see the launch of the accompanying device around the same time frame that the company launches its next generation software,” he says.

Using a holographic device such as HoloLens will allow workers to manipulate large data sets visually, rather than having to scroll through millions of lines of data in an application like Microsoft Excel.

The following video clip is actually a Microsoft advertisement, but it’s so well done it’s worth sharing:

The Hololens is not quite the holo of my Innerscape future, but it’s getting there. And I couldn’t be more pleased because it means my vision of a wristwatch-like device – the chrono – is one step closer to reality.

Don’t know what a chrono is? Well, imagine a smartwatch that you can wear on your wrist. Now imagine not having to peer at a tiny, postage stamp sized screen. Instead, imagine the chrono projecting a small holo into the air above your wrist. Now imagine being able to manipulate that holo; make it bigger or smaller, turn it 360 degrees, zoom in to just one tiny part of it…

The chrono is a long way from real, but from today it is no longer a sci-fi buff’s pipe-dream, it’s a real possibility.

Am I dancing? You bet I am. 😀

Those interested in not-so-future tech can read the complete article here:

http://www.watoday.com.au/long-reads/iinet/gadgets/#.VW5ISEaup5s

Have fun,

Meeks


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