Pride’s Children PURGATORY, NETHERWORLD 0.99 or free

I’ve read both books and loved them, reviewed them too, and I only review books that I consider /special/.
Grab a copy while the price is right. ๐Ÿ™‚

liebjabberings

If you have ever wanted to read my novels โ€“ thereโ€™s a Kindle Countdown deal starting Jan. 12 at 8am (GMT in the UK, and PT in the US) at 0.99, and all the details are at the booksโ€™ blog.

There are also instructions for creating a free BookSprout account, downloading the ebooks for free โ€“ in exchange for writing a review. I have ZERO control over the review content, as it should be, and love to read what readers think.

Iโ€™m the worst marketer ever, in addition to one of the slowest, but I LOVE my blog readers to get a bargain.

**********

A friend said you should consider a bloggerโ€™s fiction if you like their posts โ€“ makes sense.

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

22 responses to “Pride’s Children PURGATORY, NETHERWORLD 0.99 or free

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Thanks for sharing and for the nudge, Andrea. Much appreciated! And congrats to Alicia. I hope her sale goes well!

    Liked by 1 person

  • robbiesinspiration

    Thanks for this share, Meeks. Going over to have a look …

    Liked by 1 person

  • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

    Thanks! Wow. Reading, reviewing, and reblogging. Gracias.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Nada. ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€ And that is almost the only word I remember from a year of learning Castilian Spanish.

      Like

      • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

        Usually with ‘de’ = of/for. De nada as a response to Gracias means ‘for nothing,’ the early equivalent of ‘No problem.’ ๐Ÿ™‚

        You do a lot of that when being social – Mexicans are very polite – my mother brought us five girls up as she had been brought up. When we, as children, would come into a room with adults, we were encouraged to go say hello to each one, often with a cheek kiss, and to make some conversation. ยกSaluda! (go greet) my mother would say. ‘Ve a saludar! (go say hello). The ladies would think we were ill-mannered if we didn’t, and it would reflect on OUR mother… Not bad. You get used to it.

        Liked by 1 person

        • acflory

          Ah thank you! I’ll remember that. It’s actually a lot like the French ‘de rien’ = of nothing. Hardly surprising as they’re both romance languages I guess.
          I had to smile when I read about your upbringing. It rang a bell because I was brought up as a Hungarian living in Australia. Being polite and saying hello to ‘XX neni’ or YY bacsi’ was part of my upbringing too.
          So…was Spanish/Mexican your first language?

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          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            I was born in Glendale, California, where my parents relocated after the war. When I was 7, and my next sister 5, and my mother expecting, they moved us to Mexico City to be close to my mother’s parents (and possibly to avoid the air raid drills during the Cold War?) and I didn’t leave until I was 19, halfway through college, and the Communist non-students had shut down Mexico’s National Autonomous University (UNAM). Still a lot of history from that period I don’t know, but they had a connection, and I was sent to Seattle to finish college – and I never lived at home again.

            My mother said she tried to teach us Spanish in California, and we would say, “Don’t talk to me like that!” When we went to Mexico it took me longer than my younger sister to learn Spanish, but 7 is early enough not to end up with an accent. I’m bilingual and speak French, but not quite as well (and it gets less fluent by the year).

            Daddy never taught us any Hungarian. He was the oldest, so he spent his summers on HIS transplanted Hungarian grandparents in rural Michigan, so he did speak it as a kid. I don’t think his siblings did, but both his parents did. In those generations, speaking English was desirable, but the regrets happened later when people could have used having another language, but the opportunities weren’t there any more.

            There is no ‘Mexican’ per se, only Spanish with a Mexican (or Cuban or Venezuelan or Argentinian…) accent and, like English, local nouns,verbs, and idioms that make it tough for English-speakers to speak to each other sometimes.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            I’m gobsmacked. So you father is Hungarian while your mother is Mexican? I was four when I learned to speak English so technically Hungarian is my mother tongue. My parents insisted on speaking Hungarian at home so I was bilingual as well, but all my schooling was in English so I find reading and writing Hungarian very hard, despite the language being truly phonetic.
            Since Dad’s death, I haven’t spoken a word of Hungarian and often wonder if I’ve lost it. French I can still read comfortably, but conversational French is beyond me. Japanese I love but I’ve forgotten everything I every learned. Ditto Spanish and Mandarin. Oddly enough, bits of pigeon German that I picked up while travelling is still there, perhaps because of its similarity to English.
            Any now we two displaced people chat about writing…in English. ๐Ÿ˜€

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          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            Daddy was what we call First Generation American; Mother’s father was Mexican, her mother from a farm in Illinois near Chicago.

            I was born in the States, lived there until I was 7, spoke English. Then Mexico until I was 19, spoke English and Spanish, learned French at the end of my prep school. The German never stuck, but by then science was being done largely in English.

            How did we find each other? Glad to – I think there is a large Hungarian diaspora from when the Soviets took over, and maybe many Catholics saw the writing on the wall.

            I didn’t even know Hungarian was phonetic.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            My late parents and I are first generation Aussies too. Although Dad lived with us for the last years of his life, the Offspring never really learned to speak Hungarian. It’s a very hard language to learn, especially for English speakers.
            Dad taught me to read [slowly] and write [badly] when I was about eight, but I never practised enough. So I can sound out words and phrases but it’s painfully slow.
            I said that Hungarian is phonetic, and it is, but you have to know what the sounds are, and how they’re written, before you can sound them out. For example there are 2 sounds for ‘a’, 4 sounds for ‘o’ and so on. If you’re interested this is a link just to the alphabet.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_alphabet

            In the table that shows the pronunciations, the ‘a’ sounds are wrong. ‘a’ without an accent is like the ‘o’ in cot. The a with the accent is like the ‘a’ in cart. There may be other mistakes as well, but at least it gives you a feel for the spoken language.
            And then there’s the grammar. In some ways it’s a little bit like Japanese in that the pronoun is mostly understood from the form of the verb. Tricky. lol

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            So sorry – didn’t mean to make you work – I have no ability to learn Hungarian at my age an stage of disability – unless I moved there, and that’s not going to happen. However lovely and logical, I’m already losing my French (as you said about your Japanese), and sometimes it takes me a while to get back into fluent Spanish with my sisters (a Spanish which quit growing into a more adult version when I left Mexico at 19). I have a hard time not with the reading of newspapers, but with their unbelievably elaborate style (let’s see how hard we can make this sound) and vocabulary. Erudition does not impress.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            -giggles- don’t worry! I wasn’t suggesting you should learn. It’s just me with my insatiable need to share info. ๐Ÿ˜€

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            Share away – if other people don’t like our long comment streams, they can skip them. WE like to chat.

            Liked by 1 person

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