Pushing water uphill?

I just stumbled across this video, and it’s amazing! It may be physics, but most home cooks will recognize this weird phenomenon. πŸ˜€

cheers,
Meeks

About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

38 responses to “Pushing water uphill?

  • roughwighting

    Huh! I am such not a science or math or biology wizard. But I envy those who are!

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      Trust me, Pam, what I know about physics or math could fit on the head of a pin! But some of this stuff…it makes me wish I could start over and learn. πŸ˜€

      Liked by 2 people

      • roughwighting

        Yes, me too. I thought I had no aptitude for it when a girl (probably because we girls were taught it was a “boy” thing. Then I began to read Madeleine L’Engle’s journals and books and realized that we can combine physics and spirituality and the “humanness” of our characters in amazing ways. [Madeleine L’Engle was an American writer of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and young adult fiction, including A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels: A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, Many Waters, and An Acceptable Time. Her works reflect both her Christian faith and her strong interest in modern science. Wikipedia ]

        Liked by 2 people

        • acflory

          -sigh- I think we were conditioned the same way. Biology was ‘acceptable’ but I refused to get interested in physics and math. Then as a mature age student [late 20’s] I started a behavioural psychology course and discovered that I rather liked statistics…and I was good at it. Who knew? Now I can’t help wondering what might have happened if nice girls did math?

          Liked by 2 people

          • roughwighting

            Good news: My daughter majored in science in college and teaches 6th grade science. The girl students are enthralled!! And my granddaughter is in honors math. THERE IS HOPE!! πŸ™‚

            Liked by 2 people

          • acflory

            Oh my god…that is fantastic news! Congratulations to both your daughter and your granddaughter!!!!! Hope indeed. πŸ˜€

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yorgos KC

            Marie Curie was born a girl, to grow up to become a Nobel Prize awarded woman. Also, in Uni the boy:girl ration was about 1:1.

            What I mean is I’m surprised by the idea of considering maths/science a “boy” thing. I grew up in a different country, so such social ideas might not be the same, but it really surprised me. πŸ€“

            I don’t mean you are lying, or anything like that, just to be clear.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Ah Yorgos. The difference is generational. I’m 69 and back when I went to school, my best friend had to go to the local Catholic boys school to do physics and chemistry because /our/ Catholic girls school didn’t provide it.
            That’s the era I grew up in.
            Now bearing in mind that Catholic schools are private schools, imagine what the girls at the co-ed public high schools would have felt.
            I’m enormously glad that things have changed for young women of your generation. Maybe now there’ll be some true equality. -fingers crossed-

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yorgos KC

            Oh! Yes, ok, that explains it πŸ˜†
            And yes, fingers crossed🀞🀞🀞
            It’s such a shame to lose brains and talents just because of their gender, or whatever.

            Not only girls suffer, mind you, but boys too. Want to be a dancer (ballet even worse), hair dresser, make-up artist (and quite a few other things) and you are not gay? Good luck convincing your family and society. πŸ˜…

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Yes. 😦 Societal expectations are incredibly powerful. They not only shape what we think we can /do/. They shape how we even see ourselves.
            In my case, my Dad /wanted/ me to study the science side of things, especially math, but I didn’t think I was any good at it so I dug my heels in. Only many years later did I discover that there were math-like things that I did enjoy…like stats. But it was too late by then. :/

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yorgos KC

            It’s never too late to study what you want. Especially if you seek the knowledge for your own satisfaction and not for making a career. And I don’t think you wish to become an accountant, or a maths teacher, do you?

            And statistics is maths. Not just math-like πŸ˜œπŸ˜˜πŸ˜˜πŸ’–

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            LMAO! Thank you. See? That’s still the conditioning affecting how I talk about stats even now.
            As for learning new things, they do get harder with age. Or perhaps we find the effort required harder. For example, much as I pride myself on being a ‘baby techie’ when it comes to computers, I have to /force/ myself to learn things about smartphones.
            At the moment I’m teaching myself how to create and edit videos. The skill ties in with both my gaming and my teaching, and it helps that it’s also very ‘visual’, but I don’t think I could do it at all if I didn’t have a practical use for the skill/knowledge.

            Liked by 1 person

  • anne54

    How cool was this? I love how a curious mind takes something ordinary and investigates…..and ends up with a pinball maze, as well as, I am sure, lots of other applications.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Widdershins

    I wonder how big you could scale it up? Could large quantities of water be moved without a pump mechanism of some sort? Hmm … must think thoughts. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      No idea, Widds, but a fascinating question. I suspect though that you’d spend more energy heating the necessary surfaces than you’d spend on a conventional pump. Unless it were all solar driven or something…

      Liked by 2 people

      • Widdershins

        Might work on the Venus colonies. πŸ˜€

        Liked by 2 people

        • acflory

          lmao – so true! All that free heat. πŸ˜‰

          Liked by 2 people

          • Yorgos KC

            The energy cost for the heating would be much, much greater than the cost for pumping. Creating an ecological disaster, too, just to pump water, even if it was done by a cheap energy source.

            Also, the drops cannot become a “body” of water. Much water would vaporise, too, so there would be a lose of water, as well.

            As for Venus colonies… for starters the atmospheric pressure is about 100Atm (92? 93? Something like that, if memory serves) which would mean you’d need very different temperatures (higher) to produce the same phenomenon. So, nope. It won’t be a practical solution, there, either.πŸ€“

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            -giggles- I didn’t know any of that! Seriously, you know – even roughly – what the atmospheric pressure is on Venus? I am seriously impressed. πŸ˜€

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yorgos KC

            Hehe! I know many odd things, because I have a curious mind and once a question pops in it, I need to find the answer, and then I remember it. 😁

            Knowing the most peculiar facts of the most peculiar planet of our Solar system, though, it’s not that peculiar for me. I’m a Physics scientist with a specialisation in Astronomy πŸ€“ (And then studies the Art of Photography 🀣)

            Incidentally, the other odd facts about Venus are that it rotates around itself the opposite way than all planets (a very difficult to explain thing, given the theory of how the planets were formed), its day is longer than its year (an almost equally “annoying” fact) and its surface temperature is higher than Mercury’s (that’s easy to explain). πŸ€“

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            -hits forehead- I should have realised! I’ve always seen you as artistic. lol Isn’t it odd how we pigeonhole people even when we don’t mean to?
            Excuse my ignorance but..does that make you an Astrophysicist?

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yorgos KC

            πŸ€£πŸ€£πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–
            I take that you see me as an artist as a compliment. Don’t misunderstand me. I love maths and science. Studied it by my own free will, against my parents’ “better” plans and I don’t regret it. But I prefer to be considered an artist. And, frankly, maths and physics have helped me a lot with that.

            It makes me an Astronomer. Astrophysics is a post graduate specialisation of astronomy. I didn’t continue for such a degree and, even if I had done that, I’d go for Observational Astronomy. It’s considered a “dead field”, but I love it. NASA making a huge profit from Humble (and SOHO) must be laughing at all those who call the field dead, I bet 🀣

            In many countries Astronomy is considered an independent science. Greece still has it as a specialisation of Physics. Which probably is what made you think I’m Astrophysicist. On the bright side, one who studied astronomy in Greece and wants to continue for astrophysics has *a lot* fewer things to learn, as we’ve already taught those. On the negative side, we learn many useless-for-astronomy things. For me, who wanted to learn those things, though, it was only a blessing, so I’m not complaining. 😁

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Aaaaah! Where were you when I needed help on binary star systems!!!!!! As I’ve since found out, I’ve ‘fudged’ some facts rather badly in Vokhtah but it’s too late to change them now. Next time though, I am picking your brains /first/. lol
            I like that in Greece the discipline is more ‘generalist’, i.e. not strictly focused on one very narrow part of knowledge. And yes, NASA is probably laughing at the nay sayers now. πŸ™‚

            Liked by 1 person

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Wow. That was so cool, Andrea Yes, I’ve seen the simple example of this in the kitchen, but who knew that water would speed uphill?? Science is amazing. This world is amazing. Thanks for sharing that.

    Liked by 2 people

  • robbiesinspiration

    HI Meeks, it is very interesting to hear this phenomena discussed in this way.

    Liked by 2 people

  • marianallen

    LOVE IT! Especially the Hall of the Mountain King music. Very well done.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Audrey Driscoll

    Cool! Or maybe hot! Especially the maze.

    Liked by 3 people

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