Myth busting Omicron – or no, we didn’t have to live with the virus.

A lot of conservative governments justify their policies during this pandemic with the mantra that we all have to ‘live with Covid’.

Why? Apparently because we’re all going to get it eventually.

Even a relatively trusted source like Dr John Campbell maintains that ‘everyone will get Omicron’ – supposedly because it’s so contagious. Yet the actual numbers don’t add up, even in the UK.

This is a screenshot I took this morning which shows the total number of people infected with Covid-19 in the UK…since the pandemic began:

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/cases?areaType=overview&areaName=United%20Kingdom

The comments in red and green are mine. I wanted to see how many people in the UK had not had any of the Covid-19 variants. The number ended up being 50 million.

Now I know that the official figures don’t include those who were infected but had only very mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, so I’m going to double the official figure from 18 million to 36 million.

Revised estimate of people infected with Covid-19 variants = 36 million

When you subtract 36M from 68M you get 32M who have never been infected with any of the Covid-19 variants, and that’s after two years and multiple variants, including Omicron B1. Curiously, data from the UK seems to show that 68% of those infected with Omicron have been re-infected. In other words, previous exposure did not give them immunity against the variant.

Why am I banging on about stats and who has or hasn’t been infected in the UK? The answer is simple:

  • I hate grand sweeping generalisations that are not based on actual data and,
  • much of what we do here in Australia seems to reflect the trends happening in the UK… and the conservative government there wants to open up completely, based on the narrative that everyone will get the virus anyway, so they may as well make the best of it.

The truth is a little more nuanced. According to everything I understand about herd immunity, you need to have at least 70% of the total population immune to a virus for the herd immunity effect to kick in. Not just recovered from the infection but actually immune to it.

Why 70%? because that’s roughly the number of immune people you need to stop the virus from being able to replicate – i.e. spread through the community:

Herd immunity ‘ring fences’ the virus

Essentially, people who have already had the infection – and are immune to it – crowd out the new infections, so even if someone is sick and shedding the virus all over the place, that virus is falling on people who are already immune so it can’t replicate. It’s been ring-fenced.

So let’s have a look at the UK. Are they at 70% yet?

No, they’re not. More importantly, immunity gained from earlier variants of the virus doesn’t seem to provide immunity against the current variants.

In other words, having had the virus once does not guarantee you won’t get the virus again, and that means there can be no herd immunity.

The lack of herd immunity means that those who have never had the virus are not protected. Therefore, learning to ‘live with the virus’ has nothing to do with protecting the vulnerable. It is ALL about protecting the economy.

Let me be more specific. The policy of living with the virus is essentially throwing all the vulnerable members of the population under the bus. Some will live, some won’t.

So who are these vulnerable people?

They include all the conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers for sure, but they also include those who can’t be vaccinated for medical reasons – i.e. because the vaccine would have a negative reaction with their particular medication or treatment – or those with compromised immune systems for whom the vaccines are much less effective. But the list also includes those who have been fully vaccinated.

The current crop of vaccines were developed for the earlier variants and are much less effective against Omicron, so in a way, we’re right back at the start of the pandemic when we didn’t have any vaccines at all. Until a vaccine specifically designed to target Omicron and its siblings comes along, even being fully vaccinated is no guarantee of protection.

Yes, Omicron et al., may be milder than Delta, but it’s not mild. Calling it ‘mild’ instead of ‘milder’ was a neat bit of spin to justify opening up completely. Only now are we seeing how deadly this ‘mild’ virus actually is.

So why are our governments getting away with this? The answer is rather brutal: right from the start, they told people that “…only the elderly, the disabled or those with ‘co-morbidities’ will die so…don’t panic”.

The nett effect of this messaging has been to make the age groups most likely to spread the virus resent those most likely to die from it.

Why should young, healthy people have to suffer lockdowns and restrictions to save a bunch of people who are probably ‘going to die anyway’?

I believe that question, and the resentment that goes with it, is why conspiracy theories have gained such traction. People don’t want to admit how they feel so they latch onto mad stories about legitimate targets – i.e. governments and large corporations.

To be honest, my trust in governments and large corporations is pretty damn low, but the bottom line is that the people in these age groups want to live with Covid…because they don’t think it will affect them. They believe they are immortal so they don’t consider the possibility that they might have a ‘co-morbidity’ without knowing it. They don’t think about long Covid, and what it could do to the rest of their lives. They just resent having those lives interrupted for the sake of a bunch of people they don’t care about anyway.

Which brings me to a rather painful question: if a majority of people in a democracy want to let people die, is a government justified in giving them what they want?

I believe the answer is no. Once elected, the representatives of any democratic government are bound to protect everyone in that democracy, even those who voted against them or those who may have become a ‘liability’.

Protecting all members of society is the cornerstone of the social contract our parents accepted on our behalf when we were born: we give a select group of people a certain amount of power over us in exchange for the protection of the group. Why else obey laws or pay taxes?

Once that core promise of society is broken, trust dies and society falls apart.

We don’t talk about trust much, but everything in society depends on it. Trust allows us to use bits of paper as ‘money’. Trust allows us to walk around without being in fear of our lives. At its most basic, trust allows us to trust others.

Trust in government and ‘the capitalist system’ has been falling for decades now. I truly fear for the future of Western democracies.

Meeks

About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

90 responses to “Myth busting Omicron – or no, we didn’t have to live with the virus.

  • Remembering Lives

    Sorry I sent the same link twice.
    Joni Mitchell Link: https://youtu.be/Rpx-uc0nS20

    Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    Link to Neil Young story mentioning his experience with polio:https://youtu.be/OWIEQY3CXeo
    Link to Joni Mitchell discussing her experience with polio:https://youtu.be/OWIEQY3CXeo

    Like

  • Remembering Lives

    We all went through Omicron. My son and I struggled with a cough, whilst my daughter was struggling to cope with an extreme back ache. She does not normally fuss about things.I rang the doctor, who suggested anti-inflammatories. She then recovered quickly. I also took ant-inflamatories for a day or so as they helped with my breathing. It settled in our throats mainly not our chests, which is why I believe it is considered less serious. I am only saying what helped for us. This is in no way intended as advice for anybody else.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Widdershins

    Most of the provinces over here are already easing up on the majority of the ‘restrictions’, or are about to. It’s all about the money. Governments were going to start toppling if they all stayed ‘locked down’.
    I’ve never been a big fan of ‘those bloody humans’ 🙂 … but after the last two years, and more recently this whole ‘trucker’ blockade’, (which is neither – just a bunch of deluded hooligans left now) I’ll be, quite frankly surprised if we get to the end of this decade … OK, that was just a tad cynical, but only a tad.

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      I’m not totally convinced about the ‘running out of money’ argument – they’re our taxes and how they’re spent is often a bone of content. That said, the protests seem to be continuing despite the fact that most countries have eased restrictions already.
      Don’t worry, I may have caught that cynicism myself. :/

      Liked by 1 person

  • daleleelife101.blog

    You’ve nailed it Meeks. The humanity cost of personal responsibility to prevent the spread of Covid-19 is immeasurable and heartbreaking. The human costs of deaths are immeasurable and heartbreaking. Sadly, we also have to admit that the economic focus was not solely driven by bureaucracy but by people to an understandable extent. A pandemic was never going to be something any government could adequately control or mandate but they talked the talk ‘cos admitting as such would be political misstep at best and incalculable loss of control at worst. Looking back at the Spanish Flu gives us a clue as to how it will play out.

    Liked by 3 people

  • Bette A. Stevens

    Sad state of affairs we’re in around the world, Meeks. I’m saddened and very concerned too.

    Liked by 1 person

  • robbiesinspiration

    HI Meeks, Omicron is milder in that you are less likely to die form it, but it still makes a lot of people very sick. My sister’s whole family had it and she and her hubby were very sick indeed. I also have a number of friends who’ve had it and they’ve also been very sick.

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      I wonder if ‘very sick but not dead’ is because of the vaccines? I guess we won’t know until the pandemic is over and the researchers have time to quantify the effects of the vaccines.
      I recently spoke to a young guy – in a tech support call centre – and he mentioned that he’d had Covid, during the first wave. He said he’d become very sick, that his chest felt like it was full of broken glass. Since then, he does everything in his power not to get it again. I don’t think we hear enough stories about those who do get sick. Instead the media seems to focus on those who barely felt a thing, or those who have been impacted by the restrictions.
      Thanks for re-dressing the balance a bit.

      Liked by 2 people

  • Anonymole

    So, I ask myself, who’s “immune” to the flu, the Influenza flu? Pretty much nobody. Variant are constantly being produce across the planet. Next winter for us, (or this coming winter for you), a whole new set of strains will have been mutated, evolved and the H?N? will be back in our lives.

    I suspect COVID is the same. I just hope to delay my eventual infection long enough so that my constant boosting and the degradation of the severity of future strains will give me a less debilitating experience.

    Liked by 1 person

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Documentation shows that US infection rates are way down, Andrea, but deaths are still outrageous, which leads me to believe that people here aren’t bothering to get tested or are testing at home. The amount of infection is, therefore, way under-reported. The US is opening up and dropping mask mandates in many states this weekend. We are going to pretend the virus doesn’t exist, and if people die from it at 1500 a day, oh well – too bad for them; the party must go on. My husband and I are just going to keep masking up and avoiding the masses.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Remembering Lives

    I find the dialogue totally decrying lockdowns terrifying now. They are effectively giving them a licence next time this happens, to just let it rip and cull all the sick weak and elderly.

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      Yes, that’s the truly scary part because there will be a next time. No matter how much people want to believe this is the end, I don’t think Covid is done with us yet.
      I fear the non-compliance won’t end until it’s the young who are dying like flies. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    Of course they were until theybend up on the wrong end of state sanctioned euthanasia.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    Denmark has at least waited until there was an effective vaccine. Dr Tallinger reported this is what was happening in Sweden.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

    What is ALSO perfectly clear is that the same people who are wiling to throw me under the bus NOW don’t realize that once that barrier is broken – some people being more valuable than others, including their elderly parents and grandparents, and their sick children, and their compromised siblings – it will later be applied to THEM.

    Like the Danish experiment, it just kicks it down the road a bit. The people who benefit now and are sacrificed later will think they have been betrayed, when the reality is they refused to SEE.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Remembering Lives

      You reminded me of this poem:

      First they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist.
      Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because I was not a trade unionist.
      Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.
      Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

      Martin Niemoller

      It has all gone quiet now about what was happening at the peak of the pandemic in Sweden at the height of the pandemic, with elderly people being given morphine to ease their discomfort and then left to die. I believe Dr John Campbell interviewed the Swedish doctor who blew the whistle on this practice.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

        Exactly – I was looking for this very poem.

        One envies some of the Scandinavian results, but this chilled me.

        I’m a fully functioning – though disabled and chronically ill and over 70 – adult, and I don’t take kindly to being told my golden years don’t get to happen.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Remembering Lives

          They are rewriting the whole pandemic now. All the deaths are being blamed on comorbidities. Sweden’s approach cost many lives.

          Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            I’m still convinced some people want the older generation gone because 1) we’re expensive, and 2) we hold property and assets (sometimes).

            Sad if that’s your relationship with younger generations. Also wonder if it’s connected with the very high divorce rates allowed (properly – not knocking it at all) by the social net. If people don’t have to stay together (not advocating that they do, and never in cases of any kind of abuse), then kids have looser connections with a lot more people (the man grandma married the second time and the woman who now lives with grandpa, etc.).

            I don’t know what the solution is, but there are unintended consequences even to good things.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Remembering Lives

            I just think people are becoming increasingly narcissistic and care only about themselves.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Not everyone. The acts of caring and heroism haven’t received as much media attention as the selfishness, but it is there. Sadly there are just as many ‘demons’ as there are ‘angels’.

            Like

          • Remembering Lives

            I really hope you are right.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Yes, the blame levelled at Boomers is almost a cliche and completely ignores the fact that a heck of a lot of boomers are supporting their kids well into adulthood.
            I agree that the lack of permanence in the family structure has changed a lot of traditional connections, but I wonder if bundling the elderly off into retirement villages isn’t as much to blame?

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            Supporting our kids, helping them with THEIR kids, encouraging them, loving them and being loved BY them.

            I bundled myself and the husband into the retirement ‘village’ – and we told the children why: so they don’t have to worry about us in New Jersey, and them in New York, Colorado, and California! The logistics of them trying some day to take care of us long-distance in a house were mind-boggling, and here they can come, and supervise as necessary, while we have many more people to enjoy. And higher levels of care in the same building as necessary.

            The plan is a family vacation every year at a minimum – I’m in charge of finding a place at Lake Tahoe in May right now.

            Cliches have parts that are right.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            I used to teach IT at a retirement village BP [Before Pandemic] and I know they can be wonderful places. But I’ve also seen places that were horrible with Residents sitting and staring into space for hours.
            Here in Australia, a Royal Commission handed down a damning report on the Aged Care sector just recently so maybe it’s just our system that’s awful.
            I understand that people with Alzheimer’s or severe strokes or other high care needs can’t be looked after by families. It’s just too hard. I looked after my Dad six weeks before his death but he was physically still capable of looking after himself and he only had mild dementia…that was hard enough.
            Yes, your family can supervise after you become frail, but how much power will they actually have to change how you’re treated?
            What we found here was that families would protest aspects of treatment – such as ‘chemical restraints’ – but they were essentially ignored because…what were they going to do? Move a dementia patient back home? Care for a stroke victim themselves?
            Sorry, the details of the report are still far too recent. -shudder-

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            Anywhere there are public monies being expended, there are politicians trying to cut the funds, especially for expensive treatments. I understand your old age care is state-supplied; here we have Medicaid for those who don’t have resources, but it can get just as dreary, grotty, and scary as yours.

            There is a bit of a difference between those who are still healthy enough and coherent enough (or have very supportive families) to manage their own care, and those who must rely on the state – there are many older folk here terrified that they will be ‘sent to a nursing home.’ Sometimes that means exactly what they are afraid of.

            But when they demand to be kept in their homes, and require their families to still do things their way, they can be a huge burden on their children.

            Big human condition thing, made worse by economics and greed. No surprise there.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Our system is…odd. The state run aged care [here in Victoria] looked after the elder fairly well. It was the ‘private’ aged care that gets funded by the Federal government that was shown to be terrible.
            Given that residents pay outrageous sums for the privilege of being in ‘private’ aged care, the level of care they actually receive [mostly] is shameful. The reason? These private aged care suppliers are out to make a /profit/. So they cut corners.

            I’m terrified of ending up in an aged care institution, but I also recognize that the Offspring is completely incapable of caring for /me/. So pretend that something will happen before I get to that point. To be honest, I’d love to just drop dead one day. No fuss, no agonising decisions, just…gone.

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            I don’t understand your private Federal vs. public Victoria aged care – nor do I need to, she hastens to add.

            But failing to plan with eyes wide open is not a solution, and many an offspring ends up with a bigger package to handle than should have been, and I say that from watching my sister-in-law’s care for their parents.

            We’re just trying to leave an easier experience for our offspring, but I’m still having trouble getting the OH to do what needs doing OR to let ME do it, which drives me batty.

            I hate nagging, and I’m stuck there, and it is wearing on the soul.

            Soon, I hope, and then I have to find and set up a literary executor, too, while the books are NOT yet producing. I want my legacy, dam**t.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Sorry, what is the OH?
            Re planning…great if you can. 😦 My financial situation, whilst better than a lot of divorced women my age, doesn’t really allow for ‘planning’, for reasons I can’t go into. It grates on me as I’m a bit of a control freak, but I’ve learned that sometimes you just have to let go and hope. -shrug-
            I write to please myself, but I have to be honest and say that I hoped my books would make enough money to leave the Offspring a bit of pocket money once I’m gone. Don’t think that’s going to happen which is depressing. -another shrug-

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            The Other Half.

            No one expects anyone to do anything if they can’t. I’m more concerned with those who can and don’t. The majority of people refuse to see and plan accordingly. They think magic will somehow excuse them from natural consequences.

            We’re planning because we can; I know we should, given the state of affairs we had to clean up for both sets of parents, while not even being the primary caretakers for either.

            I’d just rather be famous pre-humously. Except for this pesky virus, I might make it.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Oh! Doh…now I feel stupid. lol
            Because it was just the three of us here in Australia, no other family, there was never any question of who would look after my parents when they got to be too old to care for themselves. I won’t have that luxury, but I’ve learned not to worry about things I cannot change. Not fatalistic just pragmatic. If I do end up in one of those places, I hope I can take my pc with me and play in fictional worlds until the end. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

      • acflory

        Thanks so much for reminding me of that poem. It’s one of the most powerful indictments of the human race ever written.
        The Swedish experiment…yes. I still feel sick every time I think of that state sanctioned euthanasia. The most bitter irony is that the Swedish economy is doing quite a bit worse than that of its neighbours who didn’t ‘let ‘er rip’. Poetic justice perhaps.

        Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Yes. Thank you, Alicia. You’ve just named the great big fat elephant in the room.

      Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    Do you know Neil Young had polio as a child.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    As for Neil Young, “Good on you.” His power might be limited but at least he had the guts to make a stand against all the misinformation.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      That Joe Rogan podcaster, right? A fair and honest discussion means calling out lies and misinformation, but apparently he [Rogan] doesn’t do any research so he doesn’t even know if something is fact or fiction. Sadly that seems to be his appeal. He’s like millions of people who go by their ‘gut’. Trouble is, their gut is easily manipulated by charlatans who know which emotional buttons to push.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Remembering Lives

        I was subjected to Joe Rogan for a while via my son. Fortunately he outgrew him. He then found some fighter online who actually talked a lot of sense and had a really positive impact for a while. You are right Joe Rogan obviously doesn’t know enough to seriously challenge his guests, so they get to spread their propaganda wholesale. The trouble is youngsters never knew a world with polio, smallpox etc. They have no idea how terrible these diseases are. I get so angry, having watched my son struggle through whooping cough. Polio is something else. I was researching it the other day. There is one last woman still on an iron lung. No wonder Neil Young feels so strongly.
        I actually spoke to one of the protestersl on their way to Canberra today. They claim they are fighting for freedom. I know you are part Hungarian. I remember hearing about the Hungarian Uprising, now that was an actual struggle for freedom.

        Liked by 2 people

        • acflory

          This: ‘Joe Rogan obviously doesn’t know enough to seriously challenge his guests, so they get to spread their propaganda wholesale.’ Yes! And because so many listeners identify with him, the disinformation spreads like wildfire.
          After I read your comments yesterday, I looked up the freedom rally website. I’m about to post my own conspiracy theory about /them/.
          Yes, my parents and I fled Hungary just after the Hungarian Revolution in 1956 and before the Russians retook the country. I still remember scenes from that escape. One is of jumping off one side of the train [it had stopped] while soldiers? entered from the other. Another vivid memory is of being carried on my father’s shoulders through snow. He’d told me not to cry out, no matter what happened. I’m proud to say that when he slipped an fell, I didn’t make a sound… Ahem.
          Most of the protestors are too young to have ever experienced any kind of ‘oppression’. All their lives, they’ve been safe and pretty much done whatever they wanted. More later.

          Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    I have spent my morning trawling my way through the news about the truckers this morning. I love Canada. I have been there several times. I doubt the majority of Canadians have a positive view of the protest. Yet nowhere are there views being represented. I would like to see some ordinary Canadians and some ordinary truckers giving their views instead of all the rabble rousing nonsense.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      I hadn’t heard about the truckers. I’m assuming they’re protesting against mandatory vaccinations?
      If the Canadians are anything like us, the great majority have been vaccinated, yet the media only shows those who are ‘sensational’. The bias in reporting here has been quite noticeable. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

      • Remembering Lives

        Oh yes it all over right wing media in particular. They are being hailed as heroes. Canadians are generally very sensible people. It is apparently a minority but Ottawa has been totally taken over. They are blocking roads and honking their horns day and night. They set up a gofund me page which raised 6 million dollars but Gofundme is being made to return tne money now. It has been going on for a couple of weeks. They are threatening to stay for months. I think Trudeau is giving them another week before taking serious action. I saw police confiscating jerry cans today.

        Liked by 1 person

        • acflory

          Heroes… -facepalm- This sounds so much like the ‘builders’ protests we had here. I’m sure the truckers have grievances, but I also believe they’re being manipulated. Just wish I knew by who or what.

          Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    Sorry I meant to say I had just had my 3rd jab when we all came down with coronavirus.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Remembering Lives

    I had just had when we all came down with Coronavirus. I was so pleased to read your blogpost today. Personally I think the protests going on at the moment are designed to keep us busy and not looking at the Ukraine situation. I am totally fed up with antivaxers. We had a son really sick with whooping cough thanks to the resurgence of whooping cough. Hence I have no time for anti-vaxers.
    I think you are right. We have not seen the end of this virus. It will take consistent effort and research just to keep things manageable in my view. I read a guy in the comments somewhere who was basically calling all these protesters spoiled children. I am inclined to agree. As my friend would say, “It is all about me, me, me”

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Whooping cough? Ugh, that’s bad. Humans seem to have such short memories. Polio, whooping cough, and a stack of other childhood diseases were the reason so many children never made it to adulthood. I think the issue with vaccines dates back to a theory that vaccines caused or triggered autism. It’s been disproved countless times but the fear persists. I guess it’s now spread to all vaccines. Fear and distrust of the very science that gives people their toys – iPhones, tablets, flat screen tvs, the internet, Facebook – it’s all built on science but ‘science’ is now untrustworthy. -sigh-
      And I agree re the pandemic and the need to keep things manageable. I don’t think our leaders have the first clue about how ordinary people think and feel.

      Liked by 1 person

  • CarolCooks2

    The numbers definitely don’t add up and as you say add wind to the anti-vaxxers…A thought-provoking post x

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jacqui Murray

    I did my own test of Omicron. Two participants–one not vaxxed, one triple shot. Both got Omicron (the same week! coincidence surely; they live half a country apart). Both were no more or less sick. Both recovered within a ‘few’ days. So in my survey of two, I have no idea.

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      lol – we should run a poll online! Seriously. The narrative we’re getting here is that the vaccines still reduce the severity of disease and the likelihood of death but…the numbers don’t seem to add up.
      Wish someone would start a ‘Citizen Scientist’ site. The official figures seem to be limited by all sorts of factors – PCR or Rapid Antigen Testing and reporting, the numbers of people who are unaware of having been sick at all, etc etc. Then there are those who think they’ve had it but were never tested for whatever reason. -sigh-

      Liked by 3 people

      • Jacqui Murray

        You’re conclusion is where I am, too–that vax reduces the severity. That’s good enough for me for now. I’m not excited to get another booster so I hope we aren’t going that route in the near future. That’s a lot of gunk in my system!

        Liked by 1 person

        • acflory

          I’m not due for a booster until the end of this month so I may wait to see if Moderna gets its Omicron specific vaccine out before I decide. The Offspring and I have immune problems so staying isolated is probably more effective than getting a booster that barely raises our protection. 😦 I guess we’re lucky that we /can/ stay isolated.

          Liked by 1 person

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