Covid-19 and Infections in Children

There was quite a bit of talk on Twitter yesterday about new research showing that children do get infected with Covid-19 and do infect others. For more information I went to Dr John Campbell’s Youtube channel and discovered a video addressing this very question:

Youtube channel of Dr John Campbell

During the video, Dr John looked at research submitted to the JAMA network. If you click on the JAMA network link and scroll down to the very bottom of the screen, you’ll discover that JAMA stands for the Journal of the American Medical Association:

What is JAMA?

So what’s the bottom line of this research? Basically it says that children over the age of 5 have the same viral load in their nasal swabs as adults and therefore have the same ability to infect as adults:

BUT

Children from 0 – 5 were found to have a much higher viral load, meaning that they were much more infectious:

An enlarged view of the previous screenshot

To state the bleeding obvious, this means that kindergartens and pre-school childcare MUST be closed if we’re to stop the spread of the virus. It also means that school age children are spreaders of the virus too. Given how impossible it is to maintain social distancing in school settings, this means schools must be closed as well.

Finally, although children tend to suffer less from the virus, there hasn’t been enough research done on the effect of the virus on children with co-morbidities – such as auto immune diseases. In my world, this means keeping children with asthma etc., away from any setting where they’re likely to be infected with covid-19. Better safe than very, very sorry.

Stay well,
Meeks

About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

32 responses to “Covid-19 and Infections in Children

  • robbiesinspiration

    I did know this Meeks and this was the subtle message in my twisted gingerbread house post. Children are vectors, they carry and spread the disease, often without having any symptoms at all. In the context of this post and message, on-line schooling is fine as a short term solution. When it is safe for the schools to re-open, then it is better from them to go back.

    Liked by 1 person

  • CarolCooks2

    This is scary…Definitely tough talking is required …

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      I know the science community and those in authority are learning more about this virus every day, but this research bears out what every mother already knew – kinder and primary school are when kids seem to be constantly sick. The fact that the little ones are becoming seriously ill this time is a gift, but one we adults shouldn’t abuse.

      Liked by 1 person

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Trump is pushing hard for kids to go to school and threatening school systems and states that resist. He doesn’t care in the least about kids, their teachers, or their families. It’s horrifying. One week after the state of Georgia opened their schools, they had 600 cases and had to shut the whole thing down. ARRGH!
    Thanks for sharing the truth, Andrea. We can’t repeat it enough.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Yvonne Hertzberger

    All true. However, we also have to weigh the OTHER risks if children are deprived of the social and mental benefits of attending school. It depends on the levels of infection in the communities. Here in Ontario we are ALMOST Covid free (less than 100 new cases in the entire province for two weeks, now – in a population of millions). I have see, first-hand, the negative effects of isolation on my grandson, age seven. He is more introverted than most and still developed depression. More social kids will suffer even more. They will also not learn the essential social skills we all need. While protecting them and those they are in contact with is crucial, so are those other concerns. It’s a balancing act, a dance that will need to be continually re-jigged as conditions change. In your Victoria schools may need to remain closed. Here in Ontario, in spite of the risks and fears of many, I support the decision to re-open schools in September. At this stage the benefits outweigh the risks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Remembering Lives

      I am actually a primary school teacher. I had an asthmatic son, who missed a great deal of school. I guess it helped that I am a teacher. I was always tempted to homeschool my children anyway. My experience of “socialisation” was that my children were endlessly bullied, certainly in their first school. If socialization is to be an aim of school, then a lot more emphasis needs to be placed on countering things like bullying. As teachers we have a curriculum to deliver and in all honesty I think social issues have tended to be missed.

      Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Hi Yvonne. You’re right about it being a balancing act, but I’m not 100% convinced about the socialisation argument. Yes, kids do need social contact, but it has to be healthy social contact and in many schools, bullying is the norm rather than the exception. My nephew [now in his 30’s] went to a couple of ‘good’ schools that thought a bit of school yard bullying ‘built character’, and I saw it first hand when I was doing my teaching rounds. I know that was a long time ago, but the bullying has only escalated since then.
      All of that is anecdotal, of course, and in your situation, reopening of schools may well be safe, but on general principles I think there could be safer ways of ensuring good social contact if your province has to shut down again. Maybe neighbourhood ‘bubbles’ or something.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yvonne Hertzberger

        Yes, bullying is an issue all over the world, one that needs to be dealt with. Both my sister and I were bullied – and that was an eon ago so nothing has changed other than that the internet has made it more anonymous and therefore more sinister.That said, I still believe that in most cases the benefits still outweigh the risks for most students, providing this COVID problem is kept under control. It’s not just playing with other kids. It’s group instruction, it’s learning how to be “with” others, and a host of others that are small but add up to significant results, not the least of which is resilience. Kids need to see how the world works and how they can fit into that world. This will carry throughout their lives, in their work and in their relationships. That said, it still all depends on the level of risk from COVID where they live. As we said, it’s a balancing act, one that’s not easy to determine.

        Liked by 1 person

        • acflory

          -sigh- I’m the same vintage as you and your sister, Yvonne, and I was bullied in my first school too. I’d been pretty outgoing until then. Not saying that was the only reason I became a ‘loner’ but it was part of the reason I hated my school years. I didn’t really learn to be happy with other people until the much more accepting culture of university.
          Yes, there is a lot that kids can learn from group interactions, but not all of it is good! Another issue is that here in Australia, and possibly in remote areas of Canada as well [?] long distance learning has been a thing for decades – School of the Air.
          Of course long term isolation for every child is probably not ideal.
          This is why I believe we need to aim for elimination so that within a country people can live as normally as possible. Suppression just means yoyoing back and forth all the time. -sigh-

          Liked by 2 people

  • Remembering Lives

    Great information Meeka as usual. It was always obvious that keeping schools open woulld be a really bad idea. Schools tend to harbour every bug known to man. I believe Singapore managed to keep its schools open but I believe this was the “exception which proves the rule.” Really interesting that the under fives are so very infectious, particularly as they do not tend to have to wear masks. I understand the difficulty but I am getting tough. I believe anybody who cannot wear a mask should just be required to stay home. Sorry but my area took a particularly long time to accept the restrictions. I listened to people whinge when Daniel Andrews was reluctant to lift the first quarantine.
    I am tired of all the nonsense. During the first quarantine, I had grown tired of the personal attacks on the premier for not wanting to open up. These are the very same people attacking him again. I pointed out at the time, the carnage taking place in New York and Europe. Of course, as my father would have said,”It goes in one ear and out the other.”
    I think it is time for some tough talk and telling people straight that they need to learn to be a little less gullible and a little more discerning about what they listen to.
    One of my friends is a former nurse. She got really exasperated with an anti-masker on Facebook. I believe there are some grim reaper type ads coming. They are long overdue.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      I agree. I honestly can’t see a way out of this unless we go down the NZ path of elimination/eradication. Then, if something does slip through, it /can/ be caught. This way assumes that people are going to ‘behave’ so there’ll only ever be a few infections ticking along. It’s utter BS.
      I wish there were a law against spreading false info. that causes physical harm/death. Then maybe some of the idiots would just shut up.
      You’re right about all those who bagged Dan Andrews during the first lockdown. Now they’re bagging him for not being perfect and micro managing every aspect of every policy. And of course, no one seems to care that the Feds allowed the aged care catastrophe to happen. All the double speak is doing my head in.
      Roll on the grim reaper. Seems nothing less will do.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Remembering Lives

        Actually thinking of one of mine when they were little, I had enough trouble keeping socks, shoes and hats on them, when we were out and about. I don’t think I would ever have been able to get out the door, if I had had to force them to wear a mask. Again maybe a public information campaign would help.

        Liked by 2 people

        • acflory

          lol – I remember! And no, I don’t think it’s feasible. I think we have to rethink the modern life style in total until we’re all vaccinated, or until we can eradicate the virus the way NZ and a couple of other places have done. I know NZ have had an outbreak, but it’s a small one, and they’ll plug whatever gap caused it as soon as they find it. But keeping the virus at ‘simmering’ levels is a catastrophe waiting to happen.

          Liked by 1 person

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