Vitamin D – why you want it and how to get it

The first part of this video is a little bit technical, but don’t be put off by all the scientific names. Keep watching and you’ll learn why Vitamin D may be useful against our favourite virus. You’ll also learn about its importance for other conditions, such as osteoporosis. I most definitely did not know that.

The thing I found most interesting was the explanation about why people in different geographic locations may be Vitamin D deficient. Apparently, it’s all due to the season, the angle of the sun as it hits the earth, and a country’s distance from the equator.

The video talks about the USA, but I was interested in Australia, so I went looking for a map of the world showing the equator. Then I copied the area from the equator to roughly the middle of the USA. This was the distance from the equator that gets sufficient Vitamin D in summer and winter.

Next, I placed the copy next to Australia. This is what it looks like:

World map taken from : https://mapuniversal.com/equator-line-countries-on-the-equator/

Zooming in on my home town of Melbourne, we get this:

Close up of Australia from https://mapuniversal.com/equator-line-countries-on-the-equator/

I drew the green line across from the subset map to see if Melbourne does, in fact, fall within the area that receives enough Vitamin D in winter. It does, but only just, and Tasmania seems to miss out entirely.

So yes, we all need Vitamin D, for a variety of health reasons, but no, not all of us can get it from the sun during winter. And if we go from house to car to office and back again, then there’s a good chance we won’t be getting enough Vitamin D, even in summer.

If Covid-19 has taught us anything, apart from how to bake bread, it’s that we can’t rely on technology to save us from everything. Sometimes, living an old fashioned, healthy lifestyle really is the best medicine.

cheers
Meeks

About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

28 responses to “Vitamin D – why you want it and how to get it

  • Remembering Lives

    I have fairly regularly been deficient in vitamon D, and have often been required to take a supplement anyway. So I have been a bit more dilligent of late.

    Liked by 1 person

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Great post. We’re vitamin D takers up here in Oregon where we only get 5 months of sunshine a year. I suspected that it was useful in combatting the virus. We’re also taking plenty of vitamin C, another immune system booster. Thanks for the video too, which I’ll watch later when the husband turns off the television! Lol. Be well, my friend. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Oh, of course, your state is known for rain not sun. Glad you’re already there in terms of vitamins. The way I look at it, the healthier we are generally, the more likely it is that we’ll fight off the virus.
      Stay well. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • D. Wallace Peach

        Yup. I’m feeling really stressed, so keeping up with the vitamins. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • acflory

          Stress weakens the immune system so I’m glad you’re taking the Vit D.

          I read something really heartening yesterday about a guy in Washington who sheltered about 70 protestors in his house overnight to save them from being arrested, or worse.

          There are heroes out there, quiet, unassuming people with big hearts. We have to believe they are the ones who will prevail. -hugs-

          We haven’t had much sunshine in my neck of the woods lately, and this winter is looking like more of the same so I think it’s time we started on Vit D as well.

          Take care my friend.

          Liked by 1 person

  • ecellenb

    We were using a Vitamin D3 supplement while living in the US as we spent a lot of time indoors. We are now in the tropics and get plenty of sunshine but skin cancer is always a worry, so we use the supplements here too and are cautious with time in the sun.

    I am fairly certain, now knowing the symptoms, that the hubby and I both had COVID-19 back in January. He was sick for a week (blood type O) and I was ill for three weeks (blood type A). No hospitalization so it was mild, just miserable. I believe the Vitamin D helped us from being worse off.

    John Campbell’s videos have been a godsend. I am so thankful you mentioned him!

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Oh my…. I’m so glad both you and your husband got through the virus okay. Thank you for sharing that, and yes, perhaps the Vitamin D did help. Skin cancer is an issue here as well so heaven knows what our vitamin D levels are like. The Offspring and I try to get outside for some sun, but there’s not much sun to be had at the moment. I think it’s time I got us some supplements as well.
      Thank you for the info. and yes, Dr John is fabulous. 🙂

      Like

  • Candy Korman

    Oh my! I just got diagnosed with Osteoporosis AND I live in a covid19 hot spot AND I have sun sensitive skin (two melanomas) so… this is not a one size fits all world. I get a little sun daily and take D with my calcium. I guess it’s always about balancing benefits and fears.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Ouch, no, definitely not one size fits all. I’m so glad you’re already taking the vitamin D. Was just saying to Ellen that perhaps it’s time for me to get off my butt and do so as well. -sigh- I really hate having to take stuff.

      Like

  • The Indian Mugwump

    I agree with whatever you’ve written. I hail from India, and the summers here are really harsh. Notwithstanding, people here have taken to traditional medicines to prevent themselves from either getting infected or not falling sick even if they contracted the virus. And boy, these traditional medicines seem to be working. Anyhow, for some strange reason, I’m not able to see the video. It’s buffering. I’ve bookmarked the page though. Shall get back and watch the video as well. Many thanks to you for this informative post!

    Liked by 2 people

  • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

    I supplement in summer and in winter, before in New Jersey (on the East Coast of the US) and now in California on the West Coast, because I’m not outside enough, period. It ake 200IU of D3 in little gel caplets, more if it’s deep dark winter.

    Technology makes these; not sure what you mean by not relying on it. I can’t walk, and many older people cannot get much sun on their skin – supplementation gets around brittle bones and skin diseases.

    Natural is great, if you can do it – but it’s often also time-consuming and inconvenient. We’re not farmers or hunter/gatherers any more, not most of us.

    The point is you need Vit. D – and are not usually making enough of it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      The Offspring and I have supplemented in the past as well because we, like you, have medical issues that make supplementation necessary. So I have nothing against supplements per se.
      I was suggesting that for /most/ people, supplementation isn’t necessary, and they could get all they need from more natural sources, such as food and sunshine.
      That said, people living in areas where sunshine doesn’t proved vitamin D in winter should consider supplements too. It’s definitely not a one-size-fits-all thing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

        Since we also have to worry about skin cancer from over-exposure to sun, it’s hard to know exactly what to do. We used to spend school holidays in Acapulco – and Mother made sure we were slathered with sunscreen twice a day.

        My father had a number of small skin cancers removed – he died at 91.

        As far as I know, Mother, the sun worshipper, who lived to 94, never had any.

        I had hoped for pool time this year, but I don’t know when they’ll let us go in. We moved here for the five pools – and I’m very unhappy.

        Liked by 2 people

        • acflory

          Skin cancer is a big problem here in Australia too, especially for people with very fair skin. I personally try to stay out of the sun from about 10-5pm in summer. It works for me as I have to do gardening in the early morning anyway, because of the heat. Knock on wood I don’t develop any melanomas as I age.

          I’m surprised at the pool restrictions. Are they outdoor or indoor pools? According to Dr John, the chlorine in pool water is supposed to kill the virus so the danger is from breathing next to someone close to you in the pool. In outdoor pools, at least, ‘lanes’ for swimming and limiting the number of people in the pool at any one time should be safe enough. Probably not in indoor pools though.

          I hope they get some kind of system going that will allow you to swim again. :/

          Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            The county closed the pools, and they have not reopened them, even though we’ve told them this is not a public pool. Hope they relent soon – we can follow whatever restricitons they need, but not having a pool is really hard on my joints.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Sounds like blanket regulations enacted in a hurry. 😦

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            Yes, but we’ve been requesting a change for over a month now. And we were using them safely – with no bathroom or dressing room open – when they clamped down on everyone. No one uses our pools but residents. Sigh. And it is SO hot I don’t dare go outside.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            Ah, of course. Apologies, but it’s been so cold here that it’s hard to remember that it’s almost summer over your way. I hope common sense prevails soon.

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            We’ve been over 90 something °F (in the 30s°C?), and with the pools just sitting there, the mental anguish isn’t helping. I spent last summer in the pool.

            Oddly enough the other residents don’t use the pool much, so we were probably already social distancing.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            I’m not a water baby, but we have a dinky above ground pool that doubles as extra water storage for the fire fighting pumps, and I do enjoy just paddling around in it. There’s something so soothing about the feel of warmish water against the skin.
            Is there any way you could start a petition and send it to whoever has shut the pools down? This really does sound like a bureaucratic bungle that no one seems to want to fix. 😦

            Like

          • Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt

            It’s being done – through channels – and I will sign if something needs signatures. Others here with a bit more time and determination on their hands are leading the challenge, and I’m content to be a follower.

            I got a prescription for aquatic therapy from my doctor which is being actively ignored here right now – most other people here haven’t gotten that far, so it’s proactive of me.

            Liked by 1 person

          • acflory

            That’s hopeful news. Fingers crossed some common sense prevails in officialdom.

            Like

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