Covid-19 – some practical info.

As I’ve probably mentioned before, there are all sorts of autoimmune diseases in my extended family, so this novel corona virus is of huge concern. People I love are amongst those who are most likely to die from this virus, yet the message in the media seems to be ‘it’s okay, you probably don’t have anything to worry about’.

‘You’ personally? Maybe not, but what about those you may infect?

What about the frail elderly in nursing homes?

What about those over 65 in the community?

What about young people with diabetes? asthma? multiple sclerosis? lung conditions? heart conditions?

These people are not expendable. Grrrr….

Anyway, in order to protect people in my family, and ensure that I don’t bring Covid-19 home to them, I went searching for information. The best information I’ve found so far has come from an English gentleman by the name of Dr John Campbell. This is his Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Campbellteaching

John Campbell is not a medical doctor, but he has been a medical practitioner all his life. He also has a couple of medically related PhDs. That’s where the ‘Dr’ title comes from.

I say all this so that you understand that he is a teacher in the field and knows how to do research in the field. He is not at the front line of Covid-19 research, but he is very good at explaining what is known…to us.

John Campbell’s videos also include a host of practical info that I certainly didn’t know about – such as how to wash your hands properly. I know, sounds utterly basic doesn’t it? All I can say is, watch the video and learn how to protect yourself a little better.

Stay safe,
Meeks

About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

63 responses to “Covid-19 – some practical info.

  • mrmhf

    ‪Why viral load plays a part in the severity of Coronavirus symptoms: https://myhomefarm.co.uk/coronavirus-and-viral-load

    This explanation was written by a doctor in the Midlands and elaborates on why some people get mild symptoms while others become critically ill.

    It’s also got a lot of helpful advice for families that are self-isolating.

    Like

    • acflory

      The difference in initial infection could well influence how well, or poorly, the immune system copes with the virus. Couldn’t find any data on how many virus particles can be found in a single droplet of moisture breathed out by someone with the disease, but perhaps there are less viable particles on ‘surfaces’? No idea. One thing is for sure though, staying well away from crowds and touching NOTHING will reduce the possibility of coming in contact with the virus. Stay well. 🙂

      Like

  • daleleelife101.blog

    I watching, waiting from the sidelines. Not doing or preparing to do anything very much different. I shop fortnightly and have a stash in case it’s delayed by things outside my control, or within. I hate crowds. Attend select gatherings only when necessary. Avoid sick people… often just avoid people. Wash my hands… but have adopted the MFW suggestion of humming ScoMo is a ahem… to the tune of Happy Birthday while doing so.

    Like

  • Sapling

    I don’t know why I should feel like a graffiti vandal by doing this but:

    For goodness sake https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

    Like

    • acflory

      Thanks, Sapling. Just looked up the Australia equivalent and, apart from enjoining people to wash their hands, seems to be alot of waffle. Not encouraging.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sapling

        What more than waffle can be expected? I think we need to keep in mind where we are:
        -Our governments and institutions are not omnipotent
        -Our current medical technology is fairly ineffective against viruses
        -We cannot lock healthy people in their homes because there is an economy to be run (at the very least, food to be grown)

        Washing our hands and self quarantine are indeed our best tools given these circumstances. I know this can make us feel impotent (I have elderly family members, so it can be concerning), but we really can only do so much.

        Scientists have been sharing research across borders in an unprecedented scale to find a vaccine for COVID-19. This means humanity is taking this seriously.

        Like

  • Esme upon the Cloud

    Absolutely, this article, just published over here is useful for the mask nay-sayers too – https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/08/coronavirus-face-mask-facts-spreading-covid-19
    Stay safe dearie x

    – Esme waving from a vat of home made alcohol gel upon the Cloud

    Like

    • acflory

      That’s an excellent article, Esme. Thank you. I like how it dispels the myths that have been allowed to circulate thanks to the lack of official information. I’m going to tweet that Guardian article to help get it to as many eyes as possible.

      I hope you and the Cloud stay safe and healthy too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Esme upon the Cloud

        It’s infuriating, I personally know of someone who thought the masks people were wearing were so ridiculous she was going over to them purposely coughing in their faces. Once I found out about it I told her straight that if one of those people were immunosuppressed and on chemotherapy she’ll have made an ordinarily very difficult life much worse, a crueler place for them to live; you cannot know their circumstances, they may well be concerned they’ve come into contact with someone who’s been abroad and are being better safe than sorry. She had posted her ‘fun’ on Facebook and took it down again afte I spoke to her about it, though I had actually asked her to change the content and tell her friends not to do it to folks. I was astounded because she’s a perfectly lovely girl normally; just one indoctrinated in such a fashion she didn’t realise how dangerous and cruel she was being. x

        – Esme Cloud

        Like

  • mrmhf

    We’ve made our own antiviral cleaning solution and disinfectant with a mix of IPA and water, and IPA and aloe vera for us on your skin: https://myhomefarm.co.uk/make-your-own-anti-viral-cleaning-solution-and-disinfectant

    Keep your hands clean.

    Like

  • Widdershins

    The insanity, and panic is setting in … we did our regular big stock-up shop at our bulk-buy store (we doubled up on a few things but we got a good stockpile of ‘stuff’ going at the best of times) yesterday (Friday) and they’d been cleaned out of toilet paper. This is a store that stocks these kind of things in pallets from floor to ceiling.
    So glad to hear you mention Dr Campbell – he’s worth his weight in gold-pressed latinum! 🙂 … what I particularly like is the comments section. Apart from a few trolls, is that it’s a safe place for people to vent their fears and frustrations with the … let’s be kind and call it myopia, of their families, friends, co-workers, officialdom-in-general, and feel like they’re being heard.
    One commenter today suggested that Dr John should never have to buy his own beer again. 🙂
    Stay safe, Meeks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      lmao – I’d buy him a beer! But he’ll have to wait at last six months. 😀

      Yeah, the panic buying caught us by surprise as well. One day nothing, next day, literally, empty shelves. Luckily I always buy toilet paper in bulk so we had enough to last until I managed to get some more.
      Like you and Mrs Widds, I’ve been adding a few ‘extras’ to every shop. From now on though, I’ll be doing most of my shopping online. My local supermarket offers a click&collect service. I can collect my order from the front checkouts which are right in front of the doors to the outside. I can nip in, grab my bags and nip out again without having to worry too much about the state of their air conditioning. It’s only a year old [yes, I asked] but still. Not going anywhere with canned air. Or crowds. -sigh- It’s going to be a long six months. Thank god for WordPress.

      Liked by 1 person

  • Candy Korman

    I’ve been a hand washing fanatic for a long time, but now… I’m singing as I wash. The ‘Happy Birthday Song” is recommended. But that’s too boring so… I’m working my way through classic musicals. Not a joke, but… it does make me feel more cheerful. This is not a time of good cheer. Major events are being canceled. People all over the world are worried. I’m even trying a little break from Tango dancing. Is social dancing too much of a risk? I’m not sure. But the big Architectural Digest Show has been postponed until June (NYC). The huge SxSW show in Austin Texas has been canceled. The law school where my friend works has been closed for days since one student reported contact with one of the few diagnosed cases in the country. Another friend lives close to the nursing home in Washington State that is the U.S. epicenter of the virus. Like everyone else, I’m worried and confused. In the meantime, I’ll sing songs from West Side Story, Fiddler on the Roof, Anything Goes, A little Night Music…

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Hah! I love those old musicals. Don’t forget The Kind and I. 😉

      The Offspring has been a serious hand washer for a while, and I grew up with ‘wash your hands before you touch anything edible!’ but since watching Dr John’s hand washing video, I’ve been doing the full prep for surgery wash too.
      I’m glad so many big events are being cancelled. Sadly far too many others are going ahead, despite the dangers inherent inlarge crowds. Here in Melbourne, we have a huge, yearly ‘street party’ type thing called Moombah. It has floats, rides, food blah blah. It’s great fun in normal years, but I shudder to think what will happen after this year’s event. Needless to say, the two of us haven’t left the house.
      I’m glad you’re taking a break from tango. Seriously, tango is a close contact sport!
      -hugs-
      Stay healthy.

      Like

  • wordlywoman2

    Hello Meeka, I have noticed on TV, people who are tested for corona virus, have long cotton bud type instruments inserted into their nostrils. It made me wonder if a medicated nasal spray could be added to the precautionary regime. I know that eucalyptus oil is antiviral and can be bought over the counter combined with saline.(Fess nasal spray) which I use myself for sinus relief. It’s a thought, and can’t hurt you, even if it doesn’t help. There are several 100% essential oils and blends that are anti viral and anti bacterial. There is plenty of info on the net about them, you can make your own anti bacterial room sprays too. Hope this will give you room for thought. cheers.

    Like

    • acflory

      Be very careful with eucalyptus oil! It’svery powerful stuff, and I have doubts about it’s effectiveness as a nasal spray. You could do your sinuses permanent damage. 😦 That said, a cloth with eucalyptus oil on it could be an effective, mask substitute.
      -hugs-

      Like

  • Matthew Wright

    Thanks for the heads-up to the You Tube channel. I had a look – sensible sounding stuff. It’s a worry. The death rates for COVID-19 are surprisingly high. I suppose it’s because it’s novel: once it’s become a standard part of life (as it will – this thing won’t be controlled) I suppose it’ll settle down a bit. Diseases that aren’t too bad for Europeans were significantly lethal when spread to populations that didn’t have them.

    What’s intrigued me about the whole thing has been the social reaction, such as the way toilet paper has become a sudden issue in Australia. It’s a specific response that seems somehow disconnected from what is actually going on – but that, of itself, reflects the way societies seem to work. We talk about the ‘wisdom of crowds’ in regard to point-data, but the reality of human behaviour, en masse, is that as a species we seem to be very stupid. Alas. And when facing something that can’t be seen or sensed – but which ‘might’ be invisibly anywhere, it seems – that sort of behaviour is amplified. As I mentioned over on my blog a few weeks back, the key issue at this social level isn’t the disease, it’s the economic damage – and, sure enough, the US stock market has crashed badly since. I expected it. And, as we say in New Zealand… ‘bugger’.

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      lol – bugger indeed. 🙂

      I do have to disagree with you on the disease side of things though. Covid-19 is going to be very bad for people with pre-existing conditions. Are we really okay with that? Will our societies be better off if the old and sick get quietly wiped out?

      While hale and hearty people think only of their own disease potential, it’s very easy to ignore the impact that ‘mild’ disease can and will have on others. Business as usual will just spread the virus faster.

      Don’t know if you follow the news here, but a doctor with a practice in one of the most elite suburbs of Melbourne caught the virus in the US, came back and ‘soldiered on’, potentially infecting many of his patients, including those in a local nursing home.

      The reason the virus will spread quickly through the community is because we’re being told not to panic, that it will probably be ‘mild’. Most people are used to soldiering on through mild colds, but spreading Covid-19 will not be like spreading the common cold.

      In my not so humble opinion, telling people not to panic…for the sake of the economy… is the wrong message to send, even /for/ the economy. If everyone gets sick at once, including those with pre-existing conditions, our hospitals won’t even come close to coping. There aren’t enough respirators or ICU beds to help those with the severe form of the disease.

      As John Campbell says, once containment fails, the best we can hope for is to slow the spread of the virus as much as possible. To give our health systems a chance to cope.

      What the panic buying shows /me/ is that a lot of people intend to ‘drop out’ to avoid the virus. To me, that sounds like precisely what we all should be doing. Not business as usual, not soldiering on, but being proactively /defensive/ because the vaccine could be 18 months away, and the authorities are not on top of the situation.

      I don’t have a stockpile, but only because I was too late to the party. I do intend to ‘drop out’ though, as much as possible. Not for myself, but for the Offspring.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Matthew Wright

        Sorry, bit of an ambiguity in what I said: my concerns with the economic side weren’t meant to exclude the other issues attached to the disease side of what’s going on. These are serious and not to be underestimated. I agree with all that you say. I saw the news about the doctor who kept practising – what was he thinking? And yes, it’s going to be a significant problem for even western health systems to handle.

        I definitely agree that it’s serious for those with vulnerabilities – I have an auto-immune issue myself which puts me squarely in the risk bracket, personally. I can’t do anything about it – but it’s a worry. People such as myself, the elderly, perhaps smokers or those with compromised lungs for other reasons – these are the ones who will be hit hardest.

        Dropping out seems a good approach just now. For myself, as a full-time writer, I could theoretically just stay at home. On the other hand, the work I’ve got (non-fiction) also requires meetings, research in public archives, and so on. It’s a balancing act.

        The economic issue is broader and Covid-19 merely a proximate trigger for a much deeper-founded crash that’s been ripe and ready to happen for a while. The specific trigger doesn’t have to be a virus, though that’s one that economists have been worried about (along with political upheaval, loss of confidence in markets, etc). In the case of a virus epidemic, I expect the impact will come through the way ‘thuh markits’ react to the level of fear in society. We’ve already seen the stock market undergo an unprecedented drop in the last couple of weeks. The underlying issue is that the GFC wasn’t actually repaired: it was merely postponed via the ‘stimulus packages’ and ‘quantitative easing’ (printing money) – I was actually working in NZ’s central bank when this happened & got a first-hand explanation. The world is still staring down the barrel of a second Great Depression, followed by zero economic growth for a generation. This time, there’s no resource left to buy the world out of it, unlike the GFC. That will make COVID-19 all the more problematic if it becomes another of the viruses embedded in society – as I fear it will. It’ll severely hit the ever-growing ranks of poor, who can’t afford to warm their homes or are malnourished. It’ll put a load on health systems just as governments slash them back in the name of ‘austerity’, and of course it’s the sick who will suffer. Ouch. I very much hope none of this happens… but when I look back at the last 30-odd years of western states enabling unbridled corporate greed, selfish neo-liberal wealth funnelling and all the rest – all at the expense of those who produce that wealth – I am rather cynical about the chances of getting out of the potential mess.

        Like

        • acflory

          Damn. I’m glad you’re taking the disease side seriously and apologies if it sounded as if I were lecturing you. :/ As for the long term, non-health related repercussions, those are truly terrifying. I had no idea that the GFC had only been postponed. Makes sense though. If the underlying causes remain then a return bout is pretty inevitable.
          System change rarely happens ‘gently’. I’m glad the coming one won’t be as a result of a global war, but the effects could well be just as devastating.
          On a personal note, if you do have an underlying immune problem, I really think a six month sabbatical full of writing and digital observation [of the world] is a very good idea. In person meetings are not necessary for most things. They’re just carry over habits from the pre-digital era. 🙂

          Like

  • Remembering Lives

    Birds of a feather, flock together.

    Like

  • quiall

    I have MS (30+ years) so I am vigilant. Thanks for this video.

    Like

  • Remembering Lives

    We are so fortunate to live in a time when so many things can be prevented by vaccine or treated by antibiotics. Of course nothing is perfect.

    Like

  • Remembering Lives

    My son got whooping cough a few years back, despite being fully vaccinated. It was terrible. He was a chronic asthmatic so I know what you mean about people being blase about sharing their bugs. Things had a habit of becoming serious for him. When he got pneumonia, it had appeared to have come out of nowhere. I had had no idea pneumonia could come on so swiftly. In truth we are always surrounded by deadly bugs of one kind or another. Having an asthmatic son really brought that home to me.

    Like

    • acflory

      I’m not a new age anything, but I do believe that a strong immune system is the best protection we have against disease. That said, the immune system itself can need care and feeding. I paint iodine on an unobtrusive part of my body in order to ‘feed’ my immune system. Apparently it uses iodine as fuel.

      You can get pure iodine online by googling ‘Lugol’s iodine’ or you can use Betadine which has some other stuff mixed in with it.

      Here’s hoping we all get through this with just a few sniffles.

      Like

      • Remembering Lives

        I tried everything don’t you worry. He is fortunately an adult now. I am a teacher and yes as you say, I dealt with many youngsters, who should not have been in school. I had to stay home with my son, rather than restart my career, so your post touched a nerve with me. As you say some people are just more vulnerable than others. My brother was also asthmatic, who missed an awful lot of school. Fortunately I am a teacher, because I virtually home-schooled him at times. He has done well fortunately and is in his final year at university.

        Liked by 1 person

        • acflory

          Another teacher! Hi Kindred Spirit. 🙂

          Thanks to the two-income mortgage, it’s almost impossible for kids to stay at home when they’re sick. That makes schools hot beds for the spread of everything from lice to viruses.

          So glad your son got through those early years so well. We did a lot of ‘home schooling’ too. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  • CarolCooks2

    I am so pleased it is not just me banging on about hand washing… Our daughter is a chronic asthmatic and I am worried for her the last she needs is to catch Covid-19… Take care.. Good post, Meeka 👋x

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Not good. Frankly I’d be advising her to wear a mask in public and to stay away from crowds and airconditioning as much as possible.

      No one’s come out and said the cases on the Diamond Princess cruise ship were aggravated by the air conditioning but…as far as I know, those big systems don’t have filters capable of catching something as small as a virus. It they turned virus droplets into aerosol size, the virus could have been carried throughout the entire ship. This is just me speculating but, in the absence of proof to the contrary, not taking any chances.

      Liked by 2 people

      • CarolCooks2

        Cruise ships are notorious for having viruses at the best of times…I would never go on a cruise I have too manyfriends who have caught viruses/food poisoning and been isolated for a good part of their trip…As for Sara she works from home much of the time and luckily works for a big medical company…Masks are not a deterent and unless changed regularly are a breeder of germs…Luckily she doesn’t do crowds or shopping at the best of times she is not a people person never has been…It is a worry though…

        Like

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