This man could save your life.

I know some of my friends have Type II diabetes already, and some of us, possibly myself included, are heading towards insulin resistance, so ALL of us should a) read this article and b) watch the video from start to finish. -hugs- Meeks

Storiform.com

Einstein began as an outsider. If today’s gatekeepers had run the journals in 1905, Einstein’s “miracle year” papers would have been rejected because he wasn’t employed and controlled by a university.

After he pulled the ripcord on space and time, Einstein faced rejection by his peers. That’s said to be the single most depressing thing that can happen to a person.

Physicists called him a mathematician. Mathematicians called him a physicist.

When the Nobel Committee finally realized his new-fangled universe wasn’t going away, they awarded Einstein the Nobel Prize for a fairly concrete paper he wrote on the photoelectric effect. With narrow minds, they passed over his impossibly radical discoveries — the flexibility of time and space, the equivalence of mass and energy, and the gravity of General Relativity.

To be fair, all of us have sacred-cow beliefs that we “know” are accurate beyond question. The Nobel Committee of the early 20th…

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

14 responses to “This man could save your life.

  • M. Talmage Moorehead

    Thank you for re-blogging my post! 🙂 What a rush!

    Like

    • acflory

      I consider it to be a community service. 😀 We’re all prey to the same insidious health concerns. You may be pleased to know I’m trying to cut down on bread. Small step but you have to start somewhere, right?

      Liked by 1 person

      • M. Talmage Moorehead

        Good for you! 🙂 Bread is probably the best place to start. I was on a ketotic diet for about 2 years for mental clarity’s sake. (Both my parents died with dementia.) In the last month or two, I’ve started eating more carbs (mainly quinoa, artichoke hearts and plantains) in order to gain back a little weight. Balance seems to be the key, but it’s always harder than an all-or-nothing approach, at least for me.

        Like

        • acflory

          I’m a big believer in balance, plus I admit I couldn’t give up all carbs. To be honest, after a long day of teaching I feel as if I can’t give up anything. Tomorrow, will do better tomorrow. 😦

          Liked by 1 person

          • M. Talmage Moorehead

            Balance. What’s that? Haha. I have a tendency to take things to an extreme. With the ketogenic diet I found my anxiety drop off and my tendency to ruminate on negative past experiences go away. My mood lifted a lot, my creativity and mental clarity increased, and my energy and boldness went way up, so I overdid it, in retrospect. After I lost too much weight, I didn’t have enough fat left to produce adequate ketones. Plus I lost a lot of muscle. Your method is way better than mine. Small balanced victories in moderation. Kudos! 🙂

            Like

          • acflory

            lmao – I feel as if I’m fighting a rear-guard action [excuse the pun] rather than marching forward victorious, but I do hope you balance out a bit more. That said, the benefits of the ketogenic diet sound pretty impressive.

            Liked by 1 person

          • M. Talmage Moorehead

            I’m thinking that cycling the ketogenic diet might work best for me. It seems that everything in nature comes in waves, from the fundamental fields such as electromagnetism, to the circadian rhythms, the seasons and the waves of the ocean. I’m in a non-ketotic period now (eating some gentle carbs and taking exogenous ketones), trying to gain weight and muscle back while dealing with some of my usual negative emotional issues that carbs bring me. (The exogenous ketones don’t seem to have all the same positive effects on my brain that endogenous ketones have, but at least they supply an energy source to the neurons other than glucose, which my brain doesn’t seem to burn properly anymore.)

            Like

          • acflory

            I agree with the waves analogy. I’d also add pendulums, cos they work best when they’re regular. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  • DawnGillDesigns

    and this post was super interesting. thank you

    Liked by 1 person

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Thanks for sharing, Andrea. My husband is pre-diabetic, so the more info the better. 🙂
    BTW, I just picked up book II of Mira’s story. Can’t wait to dive in!

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Oh wow…that’s not good. If I understood the gist correctly, the less processed food the better. Plus less carbs. All the things that the modern diet has in abundance. 😦

      -hugs- Thank you lovely lady.

      Liked by 1 person

  • Yvonne Hertzberger

    So eat “real food” in it’s unadulterated form and cut carbs. Yep, that makes sense ans is what helped me lose 50 pounds and get my health back eight years ago – along with discovering my personal sensitivities.

    Liked by 1 person

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