‘Like a girl’ should be a compliment, but isn’t

I just came from Embracing Authenticity’s blog where she talked about body image and how hard she has to fight to recover from anorexia. Then I dropped into A Momma’s View where I watched this mind boggling video clip:

How can anyone in their right mind not think the two are related?

Half of the entire human race is female. Imagine what we could do as a species if:

  • we valued ourselves
  • and being ‘like a girl’ were a compliment instead of an insult?

cheers

Meeks

 

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

24 responses to “‘Like a girl’ should be a compliment, but isn’t

  • anne54

    A very powerful video, Meeks. Thanks for sharing. I loved how all the girls and young women showed us that they were sensational at something sporty. And how one of the younger women said “I get out of bed like a girl…. because I am a girl”!
    The Aussie Rules women’s football team has undercut some of the sexist insults. “You play like a girl” can now be a positive when yelled at a male footballer!😄

    Like

    • acflory

      lmao! I’m not into football [I know, I’m a bad Aussie] but even I get a kick out of watching our women take the odd mark. And I’m even prouder of our Women’s Cricket team. And soccer!
      The times they are a-changing, just not fast enough. 🙂

      Like

  • Ellen Buikema

    Wonder video. I have re-posted it all over the place. Little guy didn’t realize he was insulting his sister. Maybe he will think about it more now.

    Like

    • acflory

      Hi Ellen, thanks for passing this on. I’m not a bra-burning feminist, but even I know that these kinds of unconscious put downs have to stop. If we can make just one person stop and think, we’ve helped make the world a better place. 🙂

      Like

  • Candy Korman

    ‘Like a girl’ kills me! I remember, “You throw like a girl” & “You run like a girl” as the biggest insults of childhood. Boys who were told that they “run like a girl” were devastated. My late father—a feminist on all the big issues—sighed and said “You throw like a girl” to me. It hurt. He never wanted a son, but he would have been much happier if one of his daughters took up an athletic pursuit he understood. My martial arts days were confusing to him. I went to an all-women Tae Kwon Do school because my experiences in the “regular” mixed classes were terrible. They told me I was too weak, too small, too soft, too much ‘like a girl.” Yeah, right… Before I received my black belt I had to spar with men. Let’s just say, I fought like a powerful girl and got my belt.

    Liked by 2 people

    • acflory

      Oh…you. are. a. resouce!!!!!! -huge hugs-
      Seriously? You have a black belt in taekwondo? I’ve known you for 4 years now and you only just mention it?
      -rolls eyes and grins-
      The only sport my Dad and I shared was table tennis and I have to say I was pretty good at it coz I played with only guys. But…I would have loved to do a martial art. Knowing how much work and dedication you must have put into it though…I’m sure I wouldn’t have had the determination to prove them all wrong. Go girl. lol You kickarse like a girl. Yes!

      Like

      • Candy Korman

        When I was a little girl, I wanted to be Emma Peel from the old British TV show ‘The Avengers.’ She was tall, beautiful (played by Diana Rigg), rescued the man & was never a damsel in distress… so I had to learn karate when I became a short, young adult with no chance of looking like Diana Rigg. LOL…

        Like

  • DawnGillDesigns

    ooof, but that’s a whack to the heart. We all need to take responsibility for re-educating our fellow citizens (in my opinion) in the same way that we have with their attitudes relating to race, ability, religion, sexuality etc. It’s one of those things that I have, for as long as I remember, tried to never let pass in conversation, be it at work, at home or out.
    thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  • davidprosser

    Judging by some of the fantastic female athletes we have, we should be telling boys to run like a girl, fight like a girl etc. I have local to me, Jade Jones who was an Olympic Gold Medal for judo, I wouldn’t want to tangle with her but I wish I was young enough to emulate her.
    Girls do have some distinct physical disadvantages compared to some men, but then again so do some men.
    Value women and start young and maybe they’ll go easy on you.
    Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

    • acflory

      Oddly enough I believe some martials arts are good for us because we have stronger legs, perhaps to compensate for being slightly weaker in upper body strength. Then again, there are some pretty fearsome lady boxers out there so maybe it’s just training.
      Or perhaps we simply have to value the strengths we have instead of striving after ‘male’ strengths. One thing is for sure, valuing women is the first step. -hugs-

      Liked by 3 people

  • Elizabeth Drake

    51% of the population. We need to bring back the goddess. To value what is feminine rather than scoff at it. I think the world would be a better place if we could embrace more than the dominant male-centric paradigm. Better for men and women.

    Liked by 3 people

    • acflory

      I am totally with you on that Elizabeth. Esp. about it being good for both sexes. At the moment we’re all still on the treadmill of what’s expected of us. How can we be truly individual before we allow ourselves to be different?

      Liked by 3 people

  • Carrie Rubin

    I cringe when I hear the “like a girl” expression. It’s demeaning and insulting. What’s sad is that many people don’t even realize it is.

    Liked by 1 person

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