Sci-fi now with Holo Lens and Actiongram

In a previous post I talked about holograms as a thing of the near future. I was wrong, they’re here now. Watch the video below to see how Microsoft’s Holo Lens is being teamed with Actiongram to create sci-fi right now:

If that video clip is anything to go by, the interface is still in its infancy, but given the speed with which things like 3D printers have become mainstream, I expect real life holograms to become an everyday reality within five years…and that may be a conservative estimate.

One thing I am sure of is that hologram technology will change how we work, rest and play. I wonder how much money I have in my piggy bank….

Meeks

 

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

24 responses to “Sci-fi now with Holo Lens and Actiongram

  • Carrie Rubin

    It’s kind of mind-blowing to think of what we might have a decade from now.

    Like

    • acflory

      I know! Part of me is like a kid with a new toy, really, really excited. The other part is going…’OMG…Innerscape will be outdated before I even publish it.’ And then the 63 year old me is going…’will I even be able to afford this wonderful new toy before I’m too old to enjoy it?’
      Technology is definitely a double edged sword. :/

      Liked by 1 person

  • D. Wallace Peach

    Wow. That was pretty cool. I can’t wait to see what they come up with in the next couple decades. Things are happening so fast. Thanks for sharing.

    Like

  • Candy Korman

    Lots of new technologies are coming very, very soon. I worked for a virtual reality company back in 1993/94. That was a long time ago in VR time. I’m working for a new company right now and all the equipment is smaller, cheaper, faster, easier and better. A gamer dreamland!

    Like

    • George

      Ooor… reconstruction of ancient landscapes that are long gone πŸ˜€
      And have school trips to places that you can’t possibly go.

      Like

      • acflory

        Yes! As part of Innerscape I had this scene where Miira goes to Petra [in Jordan] via VR, mostly because that is what I would love to do. Then the Pyramids, The Great Wall of China, Kyoto, inside a volcano, on top of an iceberg…..I want it now!

        Like

  • davidprosser

    Hold on there techie, me no understand. What are these holograms for, what do they do? Does all this air clicking and head moving count as exercise? I need to know.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

    Like

    • acflory

      At the moment it’s all just ‘a game’ – arranging pre-made 3D figures in your own space. But in time, holograms could take the place of input devices such as the keyboard and mouse. E.g. instead of pointing and clicking at something on a screen, you would point and ‘tap’ something that only appears as a hologram. BUT it would act as if it were real. At least, that’s my take on it.

      Like

      • Hariod Brawn

        There were many attempts at that with musical instruments, Meeks – playing spatial movement, as it were – none of which caught on. In the end, the tactile interaction seems to win, at least it has for musicians. I’m not convinced that as creatures of sentience, it necessarily assists us to bypass one of our basic five physical senses. That said, there doubtless are countless applications where having no physical contact is a benefit, or even a necessity perhaps.

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        • acflory

          As someone who loves music, I’d have to agree about the tactile contact with an instrument. You just can’t get the range of expression with an electronic keyboard, for example, because what it is capable of is standardized. With other things though…I’m not so sure.
          As a gamer, I’m already capable of suspending disbelief for quite long periods of time using only sight, sound [and sometimes] a kind of force feedback from the controller. And that’s 2D sight. Once 3D becomes the norm in games, the immersion factor will sky-rocket.
          Now imagine that I’m building a simple box using holograms, and imagine that the tech allows me to /feel/ its shape via some kind of force feedback mechanism. After a while I could easily imagine feeling that that box was real.
          Of course, the problem with designing something only in VR is that VR can’t show all of the tiny imperfections of a real world object. Inspiration, however, can often spring from things that are wrong rather than things that are right.
          Hmm…now there’s an idea to explore in a story. πŸ™‚

          Liked by 1 person

  • George

    I can’t wait to get my hands on one of those kits. Microsoft has a presence here in the form of research/educational centers and Unity already has support for the damn thing.
    I’ve been gathering information for a couple of years now on a project i want to do with augmented reality (which i prefer, because it doesn’t cut you completely off.) I’m still waiting for holograms without head gear though.

    One thing that worries me though (and it isn’t shown in promotional videos) is how tired you’d be with the control scheme. Because you are using something that makes you want to be physically involved, but the controls so far are either with head tracking, or with a gamepad. In the most advanced cases, you get a control wand or something similar.

    But imagine making actual content like 3D models in that environment so that you can get it looking right on the first try or at least close to that.
    You’d get one hell of a workout. Flailing your arms to make all the gestures. Demos from most companies show premade assets and the user is just loading those in and then manipulating them.

    Samsung is also developing a pair of headphone like devices that will manipulate your hearing to throw you off balance. So when in your virtual world you have a bobbing ship, you’ll feel that bobbing with the use of that device. Because you know, how fun is it otherwise if you don’t get to barf on a fake ship?

    Like

    • acflory

      lmao – oh I love that bit about barfing! As someone with a weak stomach, I hope it’s an option you can opt OUT of. As for the point about the physical workout, I think that could actually be a major selling point.
      When the Wii first came out I was /almost/ tempted to get one because it promised the possibility of actually moving as you play.
      -cough- my waistline could probably use a good workout. πŸ™‚

      Like

  • dancingpalmtrees

    Now if only I could send my hologram or avatar to work and I could stay home and sleep!

    Like

  • dvberkom

    Oooh. Can’t. Wait. Of course, this means REALLY immersing yourself in a book, right??? πŸ˜€

    Like

    • George Panayiotou

      Well, books and games/VR work in two different paradigms i think. A book tries to hook you in by presenting a well crafter story and letting your imagination take over, while a game/VR/any interactive thing, tries to present it’s story directly to you in creating a world and showing it to you. So in modern interactive experiences, you can’t really imagine a world that’s different than the one shown to you.

      Like

      • acflory

        Yup, I agree but it could provide a brand new way of telling a story. MMOs like FFXIV do it already by making your character an integral part of the cutscenes. This would be similar but taken to the nth degree by making the whole story a ‘cutscene’.
        I think there would still be a place for imaginative reading though. At least I hope so.

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    • acflory

      Actually I’m with George on this one – wouldn’t it be more like an interactive movie rather than a book? Or actually…it would be more like a game where you, the ‘reader’ become the character. Would have to be first person pov though, I think. Hmm….

      Like

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