A senseless death…

This post is close to my heart because children are beyond precious. They are life itself. Please read it.

don of all trades

We arrived at the Children’s Hospital Emergency Room at the same time.

He and his partner parked and I pulled up to their left and did the same.

I got out of my car and watched as the officer hurried from his seat and opened the back, driver’s side door.

When the officer grabbed the boy from the back seat of his police Tahoe, I knew almost instantly.

There was a split second though, before instantly I guess, where I didn’t know. For that split second, the officer looked like any dad grabbing his sleeping boy from the car and putting the boy’s head on his shoulder to carry him inside to sleep comfortably in his own bed.

For that split second, it was a sweet moment.

The officer, an around fifty year old white guy, clutched the little boy over his left shoulder gently, but with a clear purpose. The boy was small, a…

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

22 responses to “A senseless death…

  • Yvonne Hertzberger

    It’s so heartbreaking. When will we learn that guns kill, anger kills and innocents don’t deserve violence and death.

    Like

  • alexlaybourne

    What a terrible and tragic story Meeks! So sad when we think about what is happening to us as a society.

    There will be people who comment that in the years and centuries of old, crime and violence were just as rife, that chidlren were often lost to wars, etc, but we have grown so much since then, we have a high tech world all around us, yet we still cannot get it through out collective skull that life is precious.

    Like

    • acflory

      It’s times like these that I despair of humanity. Good people abound, like the policemen in that wonderful, terrible article, but the good people aren’t winning.

      Like

  • EllaDee

    The emotion and the anguish in the words of the story are palpable, as moving as what was shared is tragic.

    Like

  • anne54

    Such a powerful post. It was written from the heart, the heart of an obviously compassionate human being. A tragedy like this touches so many. (After so many deaths of children from guns it amazes me that changes haven’t been made to gun laws.)

    Like

    • acflory

      Yes, I think the love and respect of those policemen was what brought the whole thing home to me. Now if only we had a lobby as powerful as that of the NRA.

      Like

    • acflory

      Reading between the lines, I suspect this particular policeman would probably support changes to the gun laws. I think part of the problem is that a lot of Americans have a very different relationship with guns to us. That relationship has been hard to budge. 😦

      Like

  • davidprosser

    I started reading the comments after the main piece. I’m devastated at the fact a child died, but reading the comments I had to go a very long way before someone even mentioned guns. The minute it happened the bad language and personal attacks started.
    What is the matter with people who simply won’t understand that if you aren’t allowed by law to carry guns on the street than you can’t kill a child?
    Someone talks of America being a hunter/gatherer society still, but with handguns? Sure if you hunt have a rifle, but keep it at a range under lock and key until it’s hunting season. Change the laws so manufacturers can sell guns to dealers who hold police authorisation to have a gun for hunting but stop the NRA from pushing to keep legislation that allows the sale of handguns within the country. They aren’t needed for hunting.
    Anyone found in possession of a handgun after that is liable to an automatic 5 years in jail. Get them off the streets.
    I’ve heard the argument that guns don’t kill people, people kill people. Maybe true, but hand someone a gun and you hand them an easier means of killing.And why make it easy for someone to get hold of a gun if their aim is to kill.?
    No redcoats and indians waiting in ambush any more and if you don’t trust the Government enough not to arm yourselves against them then it’s time to change your Government. Start voting in Independants instead of the two main parties who’ve brought you to this.
    Sorry Meeks for the rant.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

    Like

    • Stephanie Allen Crist

      I agree about the need for wiser voting, but the problem with outlawing guns is that a lot of gun violence, at least in the U.S., isn’t with *legal* guns.

      Maybe it’s my proximity to Chicago or the fact that I went to school there. But I know of far too many kids dying of guns–gang violence and guns. These aren’t legal guns, but being illegal doesn’t get them off the streets.

      Drugs, guns, and people are among the biggest, if not the biggest, black market goods. The fact that it’s illegal doesn’t change the fact that it’s happening. To change that, you have to change the people who accept it as “the way things are” and you have to be ready and able to give them something better than gangs and black market living.

      We’ve failed in that. We fail to give hope. We fail to give help. We fail to change the people who use their guns as a way of life. We’re not hunters and gatherers. It’s the people who live by the laws of the concrete jungles that get each other–and anyone who might be in their line of fire–killed.

      Like

      • acflory

        We have illegal guns here too, but by and large those with illegal guns – e.g. bikie gangs – tend to shoot mostly each other. I know it sounds callous, but them I don’t really care about.

        For us, the whole gun control issue came to a head when an angelic looking young man with mental problems shot dead 32 people at a tourist venue.

        If he had been armed with, say, a machete, he would not have been capable of killing as many people as he did.

        The government of the day banned guns and we cheered.

        I guess the US will find it’s own solution when it’s ready.

        Like

        • Stephanie Allen Crist

          The problem with the gangs in the U.S. are a bit different. For one, a lot of gang members are children. For two, a lot of shooting occur in the major cities, so the chances of them hitting other people, including children, are significant. Still, the callousness is pretty much universal, in that the shootings don’t make national news (or even the front page of local news), unless a bystander is hit.

          Like

        • acflory

          It begs the question, doesn’t it? Does the media not talk about this because no one wants to know, or does no one want to know because the media is silent? Either way it sucks. No problem even disappeared simply because it was ignored.

          Like

  • acflory

    You’re not alone, David. There are so many of us. Why can’t we win on this one little thing? Is it truly so hard to stop killing children?

    Like

    • Stephanie Allen Crist

      The problem is that killing children isn’t really the problem, it’s only a symptom of an even greater failure. I know the U.S. isn’t alone in this, but the problem here is that people gravitate to gangs because they don’t think they have a choice. They can either be victims or they can be “safe” in a gang.

      A great many decisions have led to this problem. So many mistakes with so much short-sightedness have created an environment where, to the people living within it, gangs are a necessity.

      If we want to stop killing children, we have to start much further back. Why are kids dying? Yeah, guns is an easy answer, but why are there so many guns? Each answer you get leads you to another question and another and another until you actually get to problems that the society itself created as a byproduct of good intentions.

      The longest, most thorough example of this kind of searching I’ve ever seen indicates that things started going wrong when “we” decided that the state wouldn’t subsidize poor people if there was “a man in the house.” So, the men left so their kids would have some place to sleep and could have food in their tummies. Generations were raised like that and with each intervention things just got worse. We’ve created a culture within our inner cities that make gangs necessary and that disempower even those who aren’t in gangs. It’s become a way of life and I’ve yet to see anyone with any real power who actually has even the foggiest idea of how to unravel the mess our society has made of itself.

      It’s terrible and heartbreaking to read about the great many children who fall to gun violence. But, in a way, to me it’s more heartbreaking to know there are children who’ve grown up in gangs, who live and die in them without anyone on the outside ever really knowing they exist, because they believe they don’t have a choice. I don’t think we can save the little children without saving these children first.

      Like

      • acflory

        I’m so sorry. I had no idea about any of this. We grumble about so called ‘middle class welfare’ here but what you’ve described is something only a soulless bean counter could come up with. I truly had no idea that policy like that was behind the gangs. I didn’t even know there were so many gangs, and I wonder if the average American knows either? So much of our news is hype or spin, the truth rarely struggles through.

        Like

        • Stephanie Allen Crist

          The average American probably knows that our inner cities are wrought with gangs, but most of them do not know the history behind how this came to be.

          Briefly, it started with the Great Depression, which was also a drought in the U.S. People who couldn’t make it in the country moved to the cities, but they couldn’t afford housing. The government created subsidized housing. After the Great Depression, housing continued to be subsidized (and the houses and apartment complexes were all poorly maintained), but there was too much demand. So, the government decided to encourage men to support their families by denying families with men to receive subsidies. As well-intentioned as that may have been, it backfired.

          Decades later, the problem has become so entrenched it’s easier to see it as hopeless and just “the way things are” then it is to come up with realistic solutions. What’s worse is that the people are seen as the problem, not the policies. It’s almost to the point that poverty itself is treated as if it’s a crime. Few people really understand that these are people who are simply doing the best they can in the “world” the policies created for them.

          That doesn’t excuse the gang violence and the terrible things that gangs do, but it does make it a little more understandable, especially when you realize that it often starts when they’re less than twelve years old. They grow up thinking gang life and working the system (I.e. the welfare system) is normal.

          I don’t know what the solution is, but I know it starts with seeing all these people as people.

          Like

        • acflory

          ‘seeing all these people as people’. Yes. It seems all to easy to classify people as ‘other’ and then either ignore them or treat them as slightly less than human. 😦

          Like

  • Stephanie Allen Crist

    The media isn’t silent, though it can seem that way. The information is out there and there are dedicated reporters who keep bringing it up, but the p.o.v. never really catches on. Americans aren’t very good at accepting responsibility for the consequences of their government’s policy.

    Like

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