Meeka Votes

Like most Australians I am politics weary. I want it over with… but despite that, I still care.

1. I would like to punish Labor for backstabbing 1 AND 2. Those machinations revolt me, but

2. I believe Kevin07 deserves a chance to finish what he began. He, like Gough Whitlam, has a vision for the big things. Sadly that vision makes him a bad ‘politician’. But if the NBN, Kyoto and The Apology are all we get out of his two terms of office then that is still a damn good legacy.

3. I hate Tony Abbott. I hate his he-man wannabe posturing. To me that is just vanity, the kind of vanity that makes football stars believe they can do no wrong, especially to women. Not saying Abbott would ever rape anyone. Just saying his posturing appeals to a certain kind of attitude I hate. It may make him come across as an ‘every man’ kind of guy but he certainly doesn’t come across as the ‘every’ man this woman likes.

4. I hate the Greens too. They played politics with Climate Change, and much of what we have, or don’t have six years down the track is thanks to their stupidity and holier-than-thou posturing.

5. I hate the spin. I hate the spin so much I start to feel physically nauseous when I hear politicians start parroting whatever crap the spin doctors think will win hearts and minds. “We will send back the boats”. “We will buy up fishing boats.” Puleeze… Does anyone in Australia really believe the Indonesians are just going to roll over and accept this kind of bullshit?

6. I actually believe this period of hung parliament/independent influence has been a good thing – not in every detail, but as an exercise in co-operation. At best, every ruling party will have just over 50% of the first preference vote. No matter how you play with the numbers, that means an awful lot of people don’t agree with their policies. So forcing parties and independents to co-operate allows more of the voting public to get what they want. The standout exception to this was the Liberal Party. They voted against anything and everything, even the things they originally voted for.

7. I believe the role of government should be similar to a not-for-profit. The benefits from taxation should be plowed back into the country to create more wealth and well-being for people. Yet the stated aim of Liberal governments is to create a surplus while supporting business so business will support people. To me this is like putting money in the bank while allowing your kids to go barefoot in winter.

8. And last but not least, Julian Assange and Wikileaks are heroes of mine. The Big Brother mentality triggered by 9/11 is not that different to the anti-communist hysteria that swept the world during the McCarthy era in the US [1950’s]. Destroying people, and their rights, – because you fear some bogey man – is a cure far worse than the disease. Sadly that is what is happening now in this new century. I have to support the few madmen who say this is wrong.

For all those reasons I voted for Labor in the House of Representatives, and Wikileaks in the Senate.

Some people may agree with my reasons, but vehemently disagree with my choices. Others may agree with my choices, but for completely different reasons. Yet more may disagree with absolutely everything I’ve written.

That’s okay. Debate is the single most important benefit of a democracy. All I ask is that any debate that happens here on Meeka’s Mind be reasoned, and respectful of others. Please argue your point with as much passion as you want, but do not try to win that argument by putting others down. That’s just not on, and those kinds of comments will be deleted.

cheers

Meeks

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

28 responses to “Meeka Votes

  • metan

    I don’t know a single person who voted for the one they wanted to win, it was all voting for the one you hated least! A terrible way to send someone to power but it wasn’t as though there were any good choices were there?

    I was amused to see some of the lesser-known micro parties on the senate ballot paper, who would have thought of a Motoring party or a Sports party? Even more unlikely, who would have thought enough people would have voted for them so that (in some convoluted way) they could have each gained a seat!!

    Hate the spin, hate the Greens and I couldn’t vote for Julian. I didn’t see how someone whose movements are so restricted could adequately represent anyone. After listening to him on 774 recently he sounded just like every other spinning politician anyway, I had so hoped that he would be different!

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    • acflory

      Yes, my eyebrows just about hit the roof when I saw that video clip of the motoring? party guy clowning around with his mates. Seems ridiculous that people and parties work so hard, and spend so much money trying to get into the House of Reps yet these slightly, um, oddball micro parties can just waltz into the Senate with next to no effort.

      Didn’t hear Assange on 774 but I don’t mind. He was always going to be just one step up from a donkey vote. My little bit of protest.

      Now we just have to grit our teeth as reality starts to bite. I wonder what the Mad Monk will do first. I really, really hope it doesn’t include buying up leaky fishing boats. I can see that becoming a real growth industry.

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      • metan

        I’m not going to complain about the oddballs in the Senate. If it was only for the completely serious political minds with big budgets politics would become even more elitist and removed from normal life that is already is. A few weirdos in amongst them might keep them on their toes… 😉 I wonder how many went into the booth intending to vote for a minor somebody in protest and just liked the name of the Motoring or Sports Parties? I doubt that they were voted for because of the voters research and their good policies.
        As I read the micro parties names I wished that we could vote equally for three or four and that those parties had to come together to negotiate some kind of middle ground. Just imagine the Pirate, Stable Population, and Clive Palmer’s Parties all negotiating to make coherent policies as a group. Now THAT’S entertainment!

        Assange was far from impressive when interviewed by Jon Faine and I wonder about the state of his mind in the future when the poor bugger has (by his own choice, and understandably) been locked up in the one building for so long and will continue to be for the forseeable future. If I couldn’t go out I would definitely become a little.. umm… eccentric. Certainly not someone you would want to put in charge of anything!

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        • acflory

          lol – first you’d have to find a room big enough to hold Clive Palmer and the others but then you could have political sumo! I’m not big on contact sports but I’d almost pay to see that. 😉

          For Assange though, life must feel as if he’s in prison already. 😦

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  • Jennifer

    God, I’d forgotten all about the democrats and the lovely Natasha. While I agree with most of what you have to say, I do like #8 but want be saying who I voted for. Lets ust say the two majors did not feature prominently in my top 10.

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  • jenniferscoullar

    Greens all the way for me! Love that party …

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  • EllaDee

    I never understood why people couldn’t… wouldn’t discuss their political preferences and opinions in a civilized manner, as in the past one way or another people fought battles for those rights. And I applaud you for doing so. We couldn’t vote for ‘bad’ or ‘worse’… somehow although we differ on a few things mine and the G.O.’s core values resolve the same way. We opted for keep the bastards honest. And this morning insanity prevails but the ‘not happy Jan’ messages from voters was clear – they didn’t like the incumbents, or the alternative but wanted change. Let’s see how it plays out. Interesting times.

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    • acflory

      Yes, the mood for change was the message that came through loud and clear. I think the Libs won by default so in my eyes that’s kind of a hollow victory.

      Haven’t checked the results since late last night but I’ll do that now. Let’s just hope the electorate hasn’t jumped from the frypan into the fire.:(

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  • Candy Korman

    And with all that, your politics sound interesting and realistic to me. But that may be because in New York City our disgraced governor (resigned after a scandal with prostitutes) is running for Comptroller and our disgraced Congressman (resigned after a sexting scandal) is running for Mayor. The former transportation commissioner, also running for Mayor, said he would not have stopped the trains when some kittens were discovered on the tracks. His republican competition is a businessman known for bad labor practices. The cute teenaged son of one of the other democrats is becoming the media star. And this is just the primaries when the parties pick their candidates.

    I want to put my head down and cry.

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    • acflory

      Ouch. 😦 How can they be pre-selected with such a dubious history? I mean if it all came to light after they’d been elected I’d understand… but before?

      Then again I don’t really understand how the primaries work. I guess our system must seem just as strange to you.

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      • Candy Korman

        The Aussie system seems pretty rational.
        It’s not that these things came to light, they were ever present and yet these guys choose to run and people support them.
        Crazy!

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        • acflory

          Hah! If you could see our preference system you wouldn’t say it was that rational! Although I guess factoring in people’s second preferences probably leads to a more democratic result overall. Maybe.

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          • tdmckinnon

            I hate, loath and detest our preference system. ‘Now, let the circus begin.

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          • acflory

            to be honest… I hate the whole thing about this representational democracy. We’re in a safe Labor electorate so effectively we could stand on our heads and whistle Dixie for all the impact our votes have – either for or against. Do we have any clowns yet?

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  • tdmckinnon

    I think, Meeka, that you are very brave to publicly announce your allegiances: to stand and be counted, so to speak. I won’t do that but I will say that I do not like most of the policies of both major parties, and I think that there really isn’t much to chose between them. They will both say anything and do just about anything in their power struggles.

    The Labor Party began as a voice for the workers; it is no more. The Coalition has always been a bunch of smaller parties coming together in a common goal to oppose the majority voice of ‘the people’. Today, when you get past all the political posturing, neither party cares one wit for the average person. A quotation by Lord Acton, in the late eighteenth century, in a letter to Bishop Mandell Creighton, comes to mind… “Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. Great men are almost always bad men.” …and holds even truer today than it ever did.

    I will go one step further, without declaring my allegiances, and say that both major political parties have inhuman policies, either in place or planning to be put in place, in regard to the relatively small amount of people (compared to what other countries in the world face) they are demonising and calling ‘the boat people’. Australia is receiving public condemnation from the UN in regard to their asylum seeker policies, and rightly so; when strong political leadership and genuine concern at the community level coalesce – as they did during Malcolm Fraser’s time – compassion for asylum seekers is possible.

    As for ‘The Greens’, I see them in the same role the ‘Australian Democrats’ used to hold: too small to do anything except perhaps to “keep the bastards honest!” We were the worse for losing the Australian Democrats, let us not lose The Greens!

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    • acflory

      lol – how can I possibly disagree with you TD? Both parties are despicable, and the result of the vote seems to indicate that a lot of Australians feel the same way.

      With roughly half the vote counted it looks as if the coalition have been voted in. But…not with the landslide vote I’m sure a lot of people were expecting. To me, that translates as a lot of people sending a message to both major parties. To the Greens as well. The big surprise is how big the ‘other’ vote is. That’s another message right there.

      The only thing left to chew our nails over is the senate vote.

      I think if we strip away all the politics, we’re left with Australians asking for some integrity in our elected government. I’m not holding my breath but I am going to watch what happens with a keen eye.

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  • Colin

    You’re right that we disagree. I personally think, after all I’ve read about it, that Assange (who I once supported) is fundamentally dishonest.

    I wish WikiLeaks, which I support, would lose that grindstone around their necks so they could go back to what they’re doing, which is a good thing. 🙂

    But christ, it’s still two years till the next election, and I don’t even want to think about who I want to support. It feels like I can’t support any of the current parties.

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    • acflory

      I suspect Assange may be a bit of a megalomaniac, but is that reason enough to throw him to the dogs? -shrug-
      It seems as if western democracy is going through a period of two choices – bad and worse. 😦

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  • davidprosser

    They say Politics is a Dirty Business. These days it’s certainly not dirty for the politicians. By them maybe but certainly not for them.
    Over here it’s usually Labour who are profligate with our money, they like to borrow huge amounts leaving us with a National Debt big enough to sink the country in. They like to tax too and via backdoor ways as well with taxes on the goods we buy at the rate of 20%. When they are voted out the country is near bankruptcy.
    Enter the Tories who in the past have shown themselves to be more careful with the coffers and usually much more generous with taxation. Lowering it for those on the lowest pay. They’re very pro-business too. But these days they’re so alike they could be twins. The Tories are hitting the disabled by taking away their disability living allowances and replacing them with personal awards which they claim can be as much or even more. It hasn’t happened yet, most are losing some if not all their awards. The firm used to assess the disabled have a shocking record of falsifying documents and assessing based on the flimsiest evidence with a big NO. The third party Liberal, don’t even count. And though they are currently in coalition with the Tories, they don’t amount to much.on their own policies even though as coalition members they’ve screwed the people with their bartering.
    Wage rises have been suspended or limited except for…you’ve guessed, Politicians who voted themselves a nice payrise.
    Maybe I should go into politics?

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    • acflory

      I don’t know enough about British politics to comment but I can safely say ‘Don’t do it!’ As TD said – power corrupts. If you go into politics you may turn into one of THEM and then I’ll have to cut you off my xmas list. 😉

      Like

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