Mitt Romney – once a bully always a bully?

I’m an Australian and we tend to see our politicians as being little better than used-car salesmen so I do not pay much attention to politicians at all, especially when they are not even from my own country, however a friend sent me an email recently [thank you Candy] that I could not ignore. It concerns the furore that has erupted over Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Apparently Romney, aged 18, and his posse terrorized a fellow student at school by overpowering him and cutting off his long, bleached blond hair. It is unclear whether any of the boys in the posse thought the victim was gay, however it is clear that they remember the incident. Republican candidate Romney however asserts that he has no memory of the incident. When Romney, or his minders, finally decided that an apology was required it turned out to be a generic ‘sorry if I caused offence’ type statement.

Those are the facts that I could glean from the net where the media is polarized between the Romney apologists who seem to be determined to paint the incident as no more than youthful ‘hijinks’ and those who are determined to paint Romney as a dangerous bully. Which version is right?

I decided to dig a little deeper. We all know ‘what’ a bully is but what lies behind the label? The italics are mine.

According to Psychology Today :

“Bullying is a distinctive pattern of deliberately harming and humiliating others. It’s a very durable behavioral style, largely because bullies get what they want—at least at first. Bullies are made, not born, and it happens at an early age, if the normal aggression of two-year-olds isn’t handled well.”

Another source, Dr. Susan Lipkins, a psychologist for twenty five years, says :

“Many people think that bullies are either insecure or have low self-esteem. Recent research shows that some bullies may fit this description, but many bullies have high self-esteem.

The bully leads via intimidation. People follow to avoid being victimized.”

This picture of bullies with high self-esteem dove-tails nicely with an article in the American Psychology Association by psychologist Pat Ferris, MSW, PhD who says that her research into workplace bullying found that :

“…bullying tends to start at the top, trickling down through the ranks, and that bullying breeds more bullying, making it an entrenched cycle that’s tough to stop.”

So, can any of us afford to dismiss Mitt Romney’s bullying as just youthful hijinks? Something he grew out of when he became more committed to his religion?

I imagine that the right wing religious movement in the US would like to believe that getting religion is proof that Romney is now a good, kind, mature person who is well qualified to be a father figure to the nation. I am not so sure of that however my reasons rely on speculation rather than fact. I know that Romney is a Mormon. I am even prepared to believe that he is a true believer however that does not automatically make me trust him.

Why? Because of the possibility that Romney’s ‘slightly effeminate, long-haired’ victim may have been seen as gay. And, as far as I know, no religion on earth is prepared to accept homosexuality as a viable life option. I may be wrong in that assertion but I know that a core tenet of the Mormon faith is the Law of Chastity.

“The law of chastity … states that any sexual relations outside of opposite-sex marriage is prohibited.[1] Included within the prohibitions of the law of chastity is homosexual behavior. Violating the law of chastity may result in church discipline. Members of the church who self-identify as gay, lesbian, or bisexual may remain in good standing in the church if they abstain from all homosexual relations and from heterosexual relations outside of opposite-sex marriage.”[wikipedia]

The ‘abstain from all homosexual relations’ part is key. Gays who abstain must be tolerated but what of those who do not abstain? What of those who not only do not abstain but do not even belong to the church? More importantly, how would an 18 year old young adult interpret that law?

Few of us can remember every little thing that we did as teenagers or young adults but most of us can remember the things we did that we are ashamed of. Those are the things that make us feel guilty. Those are the things we do not mention in our CV’s or bring up around the dinner table for fear that even those who love us the most will look away in disgust.  Those are the things that at least some members of Romney’s posse remember.

Methinks that Mitt Romney either does remember quite well and chooses to pretend that he does not. Or. He genuinely does not remember because that incident was just one of many that he believes show what a strong, powerful leader he was, even back then. ‘Of course in this climate of political correctness the boo-hooers have the upper hand but in time those bleaters will be the first to appreciate what a true leader can do…’

Does Mitt Romney as President scare me? Oh yes. Romney has achieved pretty much all that he has ever set out to achieve, which means that what worked at 18 is still working now. That is scary because if bullying worked at 18 then why would he want to change a winning formula as President?

Once a bully always a bully.

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About acflory

I am the kind of person who always has to know why things are the way they are so my interests range from genetics and biology to politics and what makes people tick. For fun I play online mmorpgs, read, listen to a music, dance when I get the chance and landscape my rather large block. Work is writing. When a story I am working on is going well I'm on cloud nine. On bad days I go out and dig big holes... View all posts by acflory

48 responses to “Mitt Romney – once a bully always a bully?

  • TimCC

    Truth is, I doubt Mitt Romney wants the job anymore. He got what he wanted. The GOP will re-model him and his family into something that that the voters like. Will they go French?

    Like

    • acflory

      Given the state of the world at the moment I’m amazed that anyone would want the job. But why would Romney waste so much money just to be the republican candidate? Sorry, I’m not that familiar with the US system as I’m from Australia.

      Like

      • Candy

        He wants to be President. I’m from the U.S. No one runs unless they want it more than anything else in the world.

        Like

        • acflory

          I sincerely hope this is one wish that isn’t granted. Becoming President isn’t the gift you give to the man who has everything. I say let him have more socks!

          Like

          • Candy

            Yes, that’s what he needs — a nice pair of argyle socks. That should do it. Leave the Presidency to the more nuanced thinker. The problem with this election is the ‘sound bit factor.’ Romney gives people simple messages. Obama is a more subtle and complex thinker and speaker. He doesn’t provide simple answers to complex questions.

            But oh how Americans love those snappy sound bite answers…

            Like

          • acflory

            Americans aren’t alone in loving those sound bites 😦
            Sometimes I despair of the whole human race. But not today 🙂 I’m having such a wonderful day and you’re invited to my place for dinner! -hugs-

            Like

          • Candy Korman

            LOL… and with the time difference, I’ll be there for breakfast.

            Like

  • lorddavidprosser

    Seems like the bible belt is now covering a very big girth. I hope it stretches so far it breaks. I just heard from a friend that her daughter accompanied her boyfriend to church and the sermon was about women not having sex outside marriage because their body belongs to God. I’m happy to say it made her angry since she says her body is hers! No mention of men outside marriage either so perhaps that’s OK. But does that mean they can only go with married women who should then be stones as harlots ?I
    I so wish people would accept that religion is there to control people as it’s always been and start thinking for themselves instead. If people really need comfort find it in generosity of spirit and kindness instead. I don’t trust a religious person in office as you never know what takes precedence in his actions, his God or the people he serves.
    The Netherlands sounds a good idea at least they live in the moment and for me they have a good Monarchy working for the people.

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    • acflory

      I agree with everything you say David but the cynic in me says that thinking for oneself is hard work and it’s scary because it requires a level of self examination that most people shy away from.

      We all live with illusions about who and what we are. Sometimes we live up to those illusions but many, many times we don’t and facing up to that is painful. It is so much easier to find a ‘religion’ that makes you feel good about yourself while allowing you to indulge in all those feelings you might otherwise have to /question/. e.g. ‘I am a good person’ but then ‘why do I hate [insert category of choice] so much?’ may lead to ‘Oh, the Pastor said…. so it must be ok to hate XX so much’.

      Your example of women having sex outside marriage is perfect. It provides all sorts of people with all sorts of excuses for feelings and behaviour that is fundamentally UNCHRISTIAN.

      Religion, like democracy, was subverted a very long time ago.

      Like

      • lorddavidprosser

        I always thought religion made you feel bad about yourself since its based on guilt.But it seemed that some people were happy to be bad during the week since all they had to do was confess and be good on a Sunday and get a small penance to perform.With all the revelations about the church over the years , especially the Catholic priesthood, including a new one in the UK involving a boy of 12 years-old, I shudder to think what their penances were and what sins they were supposed to have committed.
        Yes, I agree with you that these days it seems the church not only offers a reason to hate someone but as we’ve seen can actively encourage it. Gays being a perfect target. But some of the more subtle ones also foster hatred for other religions too which subverts the Christian message of tolerance. That’s why I’d like to see those who do think for themselves but still attend church stand up and say “No, this is wrong. It’s not like Church is meant to be.”

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        • acflory

          I think a lot of good church goers probably do disagree with parts of every religion’s dogma – e.g. catholics who practise birth control in violation of church rulings to the contrary. Standing up and fighting for change though? -shakes head- if catholics refuse to protest about sexual abuse then what in god’s name /will/ they protest about?

          I would love to see people demanding change from within but I just can’t see it happening 😦

          Like

  • Ilil Arbel

    David and Acflory — please don’t think that all Americans are against the health reform. Many of us, myself included, believe in it and want it very much. Capitalism is failing, in the form that it is, and changes and reforms are more than welcome by a large number of the population. As for Obama, the rumor mills and the stupid conspiracy theories are to be ignored. I am not pleased by some of his policies, but I’ll have him any day over a creep like Romney. He is a decent man. Of course we have racists here, but not all of us are. Remember, he was elected by a vast majority!

    Like

    • Candy Korman

      Americans are split — in so many ways.

      I fear for the future, for my future and periodically play with the idea of leaving if the craziness continues. Although the U.S. has a constitutional separation of church and state (no state religion) many people seem determined to become a specific kind of Christian Nation — one that dictates what is right, good and kind, and dismisses the rest of us. They are bullies in a very real and powerful way.

      Healthcare reform is needed here. Everyone I know is one major illness away from financial ruin, but the conjoining of free-market capitalists and the proponents of the far right social (religious-based) policies, is strangling efforts to reform healthcare — as well as the banking/finance industry and other critical economic engines.

      I live in NYC. Our local economy draws a lot from Wall Street but even New Yorkers have figured out that we need major systemic changes. There have to rules and the widening gap between the top 1% and the rest of us is something out of a history book.

      Anyway… you can see why I tossed you the Romney bully story, rather than try to blog it on my own. My usually low blood pressure is rising as I type.

      I hope the Aussies have a better way around this. Americans need to figure it out soon.

      Like

      • lorddavidprosser

        What always surprises me Kandy is how the Church as an institution whether Catholic, Protestant, Baptist et al fight against the reform of healthcare when they are supposed to care about the poor and disaffected. I discount the Mormons from this as it’s my understanding they have invested heavily in Insurance companies who would probably be the biggest losers if the reforms did go ahead.
        I mentioned earlier about losing a friendship when things became heated on this subject yet I’ve had educated teachers use the same arguments as though they don’t understand that it’s not s free service since it’s paid for via taxes. America has lost many friends in the world with it’s policies, friends it could regain if it started to show some care for it’s people over worship of the almighty buck and playing world policeman.I have met so many remarkable people there thanks to the ‘interweb’ thingy it’s such a shame to hear of them struggling today.

        Like

        • Candy

          There’s another piece in the mix. In the states social conservatism, something that is shared across a lot of religious lines, is often combined with fiscal conservatism — free market capitalism.

          Although I know many devout people of all faiths who believe in charity and helping the poor, social policies that ‘interfere’ with ‘family values’ quash their generosity in a New York minute.

          Anything from marriage equality (same sex couples legally married), access to abortion, family planning, sex education to teaching evolution in schools, can be seen as being in opposition to ‘traditional family values.’

          Even Ron Paul, the ‘Libertarian’ challenger to Romney became very socially conservative. The libertarians used to be the ones calling for small government. Now, they want small government when it comes to business regulation, but they want the government in your doctor’s office and in your bedroom too.

          The healthcare reform act was attacked on both fronts — financial and social. The very things that most of the world think are great, like universal access to good medical care and the right to make your own decisions about your life & body, get wrapped up in a package of things that threaten Americans who want to go back in time and live in a imaginary 1955 where everything made sense and looked like a Norman Rockwell painting.

          That time/place never existed, but they are hankering for ‘the good old days.’

          Sometimes I day dream about moving in with my friends in the Netherlands.

          Like

          • acflory

            I don’t think that it’s coincidental that the 50’s were also the era of McCarthyism, followed by the Cold War. A generation grew up fearing the communist threat and so even the slightest hint of ‘socialism’ is greeted with an unreasoning fear.

            My parents and I escaped from communist Hungary just after the 1956 revolution and /they/ feared communism like the plague. They always voted Liberal [conservative] no matter what. Politics became a no-go subject at our dinner table 🙂

            The thing that saddens me the most is that despite their anti-socialist views my parents both benefited from the pensions and universal health care brought in by the Labor governments that I voted for.

            Ignorance and fear and two of the strongest motivators in the human psyche and politicians are masters at knowing how to press both buttons.

            Like

      • acflory

        I’m not sure where wordpress is going to place this reply but it’s for you Candy.

        When we [as in the rest of the world] saw Obama elected as President we all breathed a sigh of relief, believing that a decent, intelligent man who just happened to be black was finally in a position to turn the US around. I think he tried, very very hard but sometimes even Presidents can’t turn back time.

        The bully boy mentality of the Dubya era has allowed a lot of dark things to creep from the closet and I fear that the pendulum will have to complete its swing before it heads back to some sort of balance. Sorry for all the mixed metaphors. 😦

        I think the whole world would like to see the US return to being the champion of justice and the underdog. I hope that in time it will.

        If things ever get too bad you would be most welcome in Australia. We are not perfect, not by a very long, long way but there is something anti-authoritarian in all aussies that seems to keep us a little more balanced. We don’t idolize our politicians or, for the most part, our religions and most of us truly do believe that everyone should have a ‘fair go’. We differ on the definition of a fair go but healthcare is something most of us agree on. So far the gap between the richest and the poorest Australians is not too huge. Having said that though I have to confess that our response to the first Australians, the aboriginals, is something we should all be ashamed of :/

        But…but…. Australia is still a /good/ place to live. I really hope that the US goes back to being a good place to live as well. -hugs-

        Like

    • acflory

      I know that Ilil 🙂 I speaking to some of the best people right here!

      Like

  • Ilil Arbel

    Acflory — that trip was fun. Kids and dogs and grown ups all piled up and having a good time. There is NEVER an excuse for cruelty, just as you say, and I’ll spread the word about Romney until after the election. As I said, I am not an Obama fan, he is not a strong president, but he is a good man and does not hurt people or animals. So if Romney runs against Obama, then the president gets my vote.

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    • acflory

      I’m so glad Ilil. I’ve always liked Obama and coming from Australia we find his policies re national health care etc ‘natural’ rather than somehow disturbing. We aussies consider ourselves to be highly individualistic… or perhaps the word is closer to anarchic but we believe that it is the job of government to give everyone the opportunity to live good and healthy lives.

      Anyway, I wish I could vote over there just to keep Romney out of the oval office!

      Like

  • littlemissobsessivesanatomy

    o wow…what research…didnt knew all this.
    i guess a bully never stop being a bully

    Like

    • acflory

      I think a successful bully never does. There may however be hope for those who ‘fail’.

      When my daughter was just 2 or 3 I took her to McDonalds [don’t hit me! we only had orange juice and fries while she played in the playground area!]. I sat out there with her and witnessed a little boy of about 4 – big chubby kid – bullying another little boy who was about half his size. Their mothers either weren’t there or were not racing to the rescue so I was thinking about intervening when… the /little/ kid suddenly got mad. He pushed the bully to the ground, jumped on him and began pounding away.

      I was so proud of that tiny little boy and I’ve never forgotten that incident. I truly believe that bully thought long and hard about picking on /anybody/ after that. After all if a kid half his size could give him a blood nose then who is safe to pick on?

      I’m not suggesting that all bullies should be beaten but I do believe that their successes should be curdled into abject failures somehow. If the victim can’t do it then the rest of us must.

      Like

      • Ilil Arbel

        But I do suggest that all bullies should be beaten until they realize that their behavior would be punished every time. They don’t understand any other language.

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        • acflory

          -grins- you are so fierce!

          My preferred option would be a ‘taste of their own medicine’ in the form of role play where /they/ play the victim and everyone else plays the bully 😀

          Like

      • lorddavidprosser

        I think that the only way to curb the bullying of someone like Romney is to vote against him at the polls.The trouble is Obama has not proved to be a popular president withing his own country, only to those outside who liked the health care policies as much as I did/do. I believed him to be a good man.However some of those thoughts changed when he declared the special relationship with the UK over and his new best pal was France and when he started calling the Falkland Islands Las Malvinas as the Argentinians do. Half the Argentine wouldn’t know where the Falklands were if it wasn’t for their Presidents trying to ride to popularity on a cry of Nationalism.( probably to hide unacceptable laws from the people).
        But I digress ( as usual). Back to Obama for a minute. My biggest argument came about during the elections that brought him to power. I had a ‘friend’ who has a medical condition which costs a fortune in treatment and who doesn’t earn a lot. I suggested he must be quite pleased at the thought of the health service plans. He told me in no uncertain terms ‘I’m American, we are a capitalist Country. We don’t accept anything for free and don’t want it.It doesn’t work in Britain and won’t work here’ I was unfriended soon after.I was also a member of a site in the US that talked about the ongoing elections and then the results. I expected rational argument but it was rabid.They talked of him as being the son of Satan and how they had always known he was a bad lot and anyway he’s black. When I asked how, if they’d always known he was a bad lot had he become elected by the majority they resorted to personal insult. I enjoyed that and asked more questions about the frauds they accused him of until finally I was suddenly no longer a member.
        With people like those and the constant rumour mill plus people being against his medical plans ( if they haven’t been dropped) it may end up that Romney becomes the popular choice. and gets in easily.

        Like

        • acflory

          😦 I was browsing on the net today to see if there were any new developments with Romney’s bullying expose and I stumbled on a site where the comments were quite rabid too. Some people just hated Obama for not waving a magic wand and making them all affluent again and some seemed to believe that because Romney is rich he will have a magic wand in his back pocket to make them all affluent again. And a few tried to raise reasoned arguments and got nowhere.

          At the height of the Carbon Tax debate here in oz I did spend some time on the Labor forum so I have seen some pretty irrational people before but not too many got personal with their insults. Must admit I’m not used to that level of vitriol :/

          Like

      • littlemissobsessivesanatomy

        Most of people learn lessons when shown a mirror…
        if you embarrass someone by copying them only then they realize where they went wrong…
        a bully must be captured in a video and should then be shown it on a big screen…
        if someone captured my messy room and showed it to me i would totally accept it as messy, until then i would be proud of it..wouldn’t i? 😛

        i think beating a bully would make him more angry and agitated, hence even more harmful to people who cant protect themselves.. i dont know..i think it hardly effects

        Like

        • acflory

          I think that works on nice people Littlemiss but I wonder whether the Romneys of the world might not just see that as validation for themselves. It’s a damned hard nut to crack 😦

          Like

  • Candy Korman

    I am so happy to hear ALL these comments from far away!

    Like

  • Ilil Arbel

    It is not just just youthful hijinks. Romney has also mistreated his dog later in life, as a married man with a family, by making him travel on the top of his car, in his carrier, frightening the poor thing into ill health. Even after seeing what happened during a break in the trip, he tied him right back up again for the rest of the trip. Between bullying and mistreating animals, I would not want him as a president. He is not a good man. I do not approve of Obama’s policies in many instances, but he is at least a decent man and would hurt no one.

    Like

    • acflory

      Why in gods name did he tie the dog to the roof of his car?????? Is he nuts or just a miserable bastard?

      I didn’t want to suggest that he has sociopath traits but mistreating animals on top of being a bully is like a red flag to me.

      Thanks for that bit of info. I wonder how many people know what he’s like when the cameras are turned off 😦

      Like

      • Ilil Arbel

        He put the dog in his carrier, and tied the carrier to the roof. When asked why, he said the car was full of his children. The dog was so scared he had diarhea, and Romney hosed him and the carrier down in the stop, and then put him right back on the roof and continued the trip. As far as I am concerned he is a criminal. And having been a bully in his youth, that explains a lot. They don’t change, you know.

        Like

        • acflory

          Christ….

          My ex and I took my daughter and our nephew away for a weekend once, in a tiny toyota. The boot was full of stuff, the foot wells were full of more stuff. The two kids [about 8] sat in the back with our two small terrier dogs and looked after them the whole way there and back. Both dogs used to get car sick so we dosed them with tablets from the vet and they were fine. The kids were fine. We were fine and all 6 of us had a great time.

          There is never an excuse for cruelty. Ever.

          Like

      • metan

        I thought about this for a few days and it suddenly occurred to me to question what on earth his wife thought of this event with the dog? Did she not stand up to him when she saw it was something so wrong? If not why not? She is either scared of him or as much in the wrong as him. One more thing to add to the bad list.

        Like

        • acflory

          Sorry – just had to adjust ‘discussions’ coz wordpress wasn’t showing nested comments deep enough.

          And yes, I wondered about that too. I think I might see if there is any stuff on the net about her and the family. I’ll post back if I find anything interesting.

          Like

  • lorddavidprosser

    Something that I had to ask myself was whether Romney was the instigator of the bullying back then and whether there were other similar incidents. It’s more than likely there was lots of long hair at that time and if it didn’t fit in with the traditional Mormon pattern of ‘School Dress’ I can see a little gang like this doing it often.Having said that, if it was a Mormon school perhaps the long hair was such a rarity they didn’t have too. I’ll bet other things came under their magnifying glass though for them to disapprove of.
    I’d also like to know the reasons that were given for the attack. Was it because it didn’t fit the Mormon lifestyle and values. Was it a school related thing or just a general dislike of the individual.
    The other thing that made me wonder was the 18 year-old getting religion. It strikes me that religion is bread and butter for a Mormon from birth and Romney would have been indoctrinated from day one. So, does being a Mormon make you a bully towards anything you see as outside the faith?
    I shouldn’t mock really but wasn’t it strange that the leader of the Mormons, Joseph Smith had this strange epiphany about God where he’s led to a mountain to receive commandments on gold plates (that then disappear). Sounds rather Moses like doesn’t it.
    It also strikes me as hugely rue that the Mormons are supposedly collecting the names of everyone in the world to store on a supercomputer somewhere in Utah to convert all sinners to Mormonism on the day of judgement. I prefer to choose thank you. And if you ever get an email or a mailing asking whether you want a book about your name and all others in the world sharing it, it comes from the very business conscious Mormon Church who are not behind the door when it comes to fundraising. CD’s, Dvd’s are all a big part of their business of selling religion to the masses along with the missionaries they send abroad to increase their flock of tithe givers to the church.

    Like

    • acflory

      lol – just emailed you about this but you beat me to it!

      From what I’ve been able to gather Romney was the leader of the pack, not a follower. I think that speaks volumes. And yes, mormons are indoctrinated from a young age but apparently that revelation of Romney’s came after the car he was driving was involved in an accident and someone was killed. I don’t know any of the details which was why I didn’t mention it in the post. It is possible that a near miss with death may have changed him but if that were the case you’d think he’d remember something he has since come to regret.

      I’m just praying [to the gods of chance?] that Obama gets back for another term. At least there is some warmth to the man and he does have good intentions that go beyond ego.

      Honestly… why can’t our politicians just be chosen by random ballot out of the general populace? If that’s good enough for a jury then it should be good enough for government. Or at least it could not be much worse!

      Like

  • metan

    Having two kids at primary school means I am regularly made aware of bullying. I am lucky, the school deals well with them and does its best to nip any anti-social behaviour in the bud. What I do see, though, is that rarely do bullies ever change their ways, they just get better at hiding it. Their bullying just becomes less overt as the attitude that started such behaviour doesn’t go away.

    I can’t imagine that a person with a large enough ego to think he should be in charge of a world power would think too much about how his past behavior affected others. I doubt he ever thinks about something dreadful he did to a weaker person many years ago. What kind of person treats another that way? Not someone I would want in charge of my country, that’s for sure. Who is to say he has changed? Maybe he just got better at hiding it as well.

    Like

    • acflory

      Sadly I think you’ve got it in one. I know all politicians have to have egos the size of a barn to want to get into office in the first place – shades of the mad Monk and La Guillard – but when the ego is teamed with bullying all my alarms start ringing. I keep thinking of that red button and break out in a sweat.

      Like

  • Candy

    Wow! Great reading a view from another part of the world. I’ve been fascinated by the coverage here.

    A couple of the other bullies recalled the event and regretted their participation. They had grown and changed since their teen years. When Romney was interviewed by the most conservative of the cable news networks, nervous laughter accompanied his statement about not remembering the incident. To me, that was the most telling part of the story. Terrorizing a vulnerable peer should mark you. You should remember doing it. And most of all, you should regret it like crazy!

    Like

    • acflory

      Should being the operative word. I didn’t mention the word ’empathy’ in the post because I didn’t want to go too far and imply that Romney might be a closet sociopath but the thought did cross my mind 😦

      Like

      • Candy Korman

        A disturbing article on a related topic:

        http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/13/magazine/can-you-call-a-9-year-old-a-psychopath.html?_r=1&hpw

        Basically what makes a sociopath and when. Fascinating and frightening.

        Like

      • acflory

        I’m stunned. I knew something about the condition in adults but I had no idea it could manifest in kids so young. It would be nice to think that psychopathy can be treated if caught early enough but the prospects don’t look promising. It seems that cognitive conditioning may be the best that these kids, or at least their parents, can hope for. Shades of Dexter 😦

        If psychopathy falls along a continuum then serial killers might be at one end of the scale and ruthless business people at the other.

        Ilil Arbel posted about something Romney did when he took the family and the family dog on vacation or whatever. Apparently he put the dog in a pet carrier, tied the pet carrier to the roof of the car and drove off that way. The animal was traumatized. When I read about the child who systematically cut the tail off a cat the cold, logic made me shiver.

        We take empathy for granted. Maybe we shouldn’t.

        Like

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