How to make an egg sandwich…if you’re a robot

Was literally eating my muesli when I stumbled across this gem – two robot arms making a rather odd egg sandwich:

Off to work. Happy Monday.

Meeks0.


A steampunk submarine?

steampunk submarineI love all things tech, even weird tech, and the star of Candy Korman’s post today is perhaps the weirdest I’ve ever come across.

The Duikboot model was based on the innovative design for a submarine by Antoine Lipkens and built of copper, brass, iron, lead glass and rope by Olke Uhlembeck in 1835/40.’

The steampunk submarine was never built – for obvious reasons – but just the thought of it makes me smile. There’s a picture of it on Candy’s blog and I strongly suggest reading the whole thing:

http://www.candysmonsters.com/steampunk-summer-moment/#comment-2793

I hope this makes you smile too. Cheers,

Meeks


Libraries as publishers?

The Windsor Public Library [in Canada] may be the first [?] library to create paperbacks for Indies, but I suspect it won’t be the last. And I’ll be at the head of the queue when my local library gets a POD machine!

Wondering what I’m talking about? Follow the link below to read about a very forward thinking library that is doing print-on-demand [POD] for it’s members:

http://blogs.windsorstar.com/news/with-10699-books-printed-windsor-librarys-self-publishing-machine-is-a-hit

And before anyone mentions the name ‘Createspace’, I know, we can all create POD versions of our books on Amazon. But…

  • while Createspace may be very reasonably priced, the postage to Australia is not,
  • and nothing beats the convenience of going to your local library and having a real person solve problems for you, in real time.

I don’t know when POD machines will come to libraries in Australia, but I for one can’t wait. Just think, if I managed to publish one book per year, I’d have Christmas presents solved for life. ;)

cheers

Meeks

 


Old companies recycling their business models and making a profit

As a writer, I’m bombarded every day by news stories about the Big Five publishing companies, and how they seem to be incapable of changing with the times and embracing the new world order. Well as a nice change, here’s an article about Renault, IBM and some other old, established companies completely changing how they do business.

https://wordpress.com/read/post/feed/4734485/754279934

These companies are embracing a circular manufacturing model in which they re-use, recycle, re-purpose and re-design their products to use less of everything. And the money’s rolling in.

All I can say is ‘Bravo!’

cheers

Meeks


The making of a Katana – the traditional way

After all the software heavy posts lately, I was ready for something different. This may be a bit too different, but hey, it’s my blog!

This is for all the Japanophiles out there who love katanas and Kill Bill. The video is about a bunch of guys with insane blacksmithing skills who recreated the sword crafted in Kill Bill. All the techniques are traditional and, having seen what they involve, I now know why Japanese swords have such an amazing reputation.

Enjoy. :)


Gmail for Beginners, Part 5 – opening an attachment & attaching a picture [Windows 7]

Part 1, Getting Started is here.
Part 2, Finding and Reading emails is here.
Part 3, Replying to an email & Saving a Contact is here.
Part 4, Composing an email & inserting a smiley is here.

Warning! Some of the screenshots and step-by-step instructions appearing in Part 5 are only applicable to Windows 7.

The screenshots and instructions pertaining to Gmail – i.e. how to open an attachment – will be the same for everyone, but the instructions for finding a picture on your PC [in order to attach it to an email] will only be relevant to Windows 7 users. This is because people using other operating systems – such as a MAC or Windows XP, Vista, or one of the 8’s – may not see the same things on their own PCs.

What are attachments?

Attachments are simply files that you send along with your email message. Most of these files cause no problems whatsoever, but some hackers will use attachments to sneak viruses onto your computer. These viruses are triggered when you ‘open’ the attachment. For this reason, ALL attachments should be treated with caution.

Internet security and staying safe

When I first started browsing the internet I thought I would be safe from viruses because, well, you know, how would a hacker even know I existed? It was not as if I was someone important.

-blushes with embarrassment-

What I did not know was that hackers do not care about me personally. In fact, they do not target me at all. Quite simply, hackers throw out huge, baited nets and wait to see what bites. And yes, my PC did get infected.

I’ve learned a lot since then, and one of the things I’ve learned is to be very, very wary of attachments. Before I click on an attachment I check a couple of things carefully:

  • do I know the sender? If the answer is ‘no’, I automatically assume the attachment is suspect and  delete the whole email,
  • does the sender [someone I do know] sound a bit odd – i.e. is the email a generic sounding one-liner such as ‘hi, thought you might like this’ or something similar? If it is, I’ll delete the email and the attachment first and apologise, if necessary, later.

This lack of certainty when it comes to attachments brings me to a bit of netiquette – if you are sending someone an attachment, it is a really good idea to tell them about it in the email message itself.  It’s a small thing but will reassure the recipient the attachment is safe to open.

As a general rule, however, I will never open an attachment if the filename ends in ‘.exe’ or ‘.zip’.

[Note: for a description of filenames, seeHow can you tell what’s a picture file and what isn’t?below].

There are exceptions to this rule of thumb, but beginners should probably delete first and ask questions later.

So what attachments are safe to open?

Picture files are generally safe to open, unless there is something else suspicious about the email – e.g. it’s from someone you’ve never heard of, or promises something unsavoury.

How can you tell what’s a picture file and what isn’t?

Like people, files have a ‘first name’ and a ‘family’ name. The ‘first name’ describes what’s in the file while the ‘last name’ describes what kind of file it is – i.e. one of the picture files, a text file, a music file, etc.

To illustrate this naming process, have a look at the following example:

picture file exampleThis is a simple picture created in Windows Paint. It was saved as a file called:

picture file example.jpg

‘picture file example’ = the first name of the file

‘.jpg’ = the family name of the file – i.e. what type of file it is. In computerspeak, this part of the file name is called the file extension. The file extension tells the computer how to handle the file – i.e. as a picture file rather than, say, a music file.

Examples of picture files

The following are examples of the most common types of picture files. Notice that only the file extension changes in each filename:

mypicture.jpg

mypicture.bmp

mypicture.png

mypicture.tiff

If you get an email from a friend, and if the attachment in that email ends in any of the above file extensions, the attachment is safe to open.

How to open an attachment in an email

Returning to our friend, Kenneth, I discover that he has sent me an email at meekasmind@gmail.com. The email has a file attached. When I read the email, this is what I see:

gmail attachment received 1

As you can see, part of the picture has been truncated in the preview. To see it all, I point the mouse at the picture. This causes an overlay to be displayed:

gmail attachment received 2This overlay shows the full filename of the attachment, including its file extension which tells me it is a picture file. Also of interest is the ’15 KB’ which tells me how big the file is.

[Note: A huge picture file would be shown in GB, an average picture file would be shown in MB, and a small picture file would be shown in KB. Thus the attachment from Kenneth is quite small and will take next to no time to load]

The overlay also contains the buttons for two options – Download and Save to Drive.

Save to Drive option

Clicking this option will save the file to Google Drive [a storage area in the Cloud]. This option is not covered in the Beginners guide.

Download option

Clicking the ‘Download’ option will copy the file from the email and save it to my own PC. Once the file is on my PC, I can do whatever I want with it. This is the option we will be exploring.

When I click the Download button [in Windows 7], the screen changes to display the last location at which I saved something. In the example below, you can see that it was in ‘Libraries, Documents, My Documents, My Games, Final Fantasy xiv – A Realm Reborn’. This is not where I want to save the attachment.

gmail attachment download 1

To make it easier to see where I’m going, I will close the Documents folder I am in. To do this I simply click on the small arrow next to ‘Documents’ in the navigation pane:

gmail attachment download location

I can now see the main folders quite clearly, including the folder I want to reach. It is called ‘Pictures’ :

gmail attachment download location 2

A single click on the ‘Pictures’ folder causes the ‘Pictures Library’ to be displayed. In the Library is a folder called ‘Sample Pictures’. This is where I want to save the attachment:

gmail attachment download location 3

The easiest way to open the folder is to click on the ‘Sample Pictures’ icon once. This will highlight the icon, and it will cause the ‘Save’ button to change to ‘Open’ [as shown above]. Now all you have to do is click the ‘Open’ button.

Once ‘Sample Pictures’ opens up, the ‘Save’ button reappears.

Click the ‘Save’ button to save the attachment to this location.

Now that I’ve saved the picture file to my PC I can edit it if I want to. I do, I did, and this is the result:

picture file example black and whiteNaturally, I want to share the new picture with Kenneth so I compose an email to him [see Part 4].

Before I click the ‘Send’ button, however, I click the small ‘Attach Files’ icon shown at the bottom of the compose form.

It looks like this:

picture file attach icon

Clicking the attach icon in Gmail causes the following screen to be displayed in Windows 7:

gmail attachment send location 3

This screenshot is almost identical to the one we saw before…except that in this one, the image peeping out of the folder is of the edited house. That’s because I saved the edited file to the same location as the attachment.

Click on the ‘Open’ button [as shown above]. The following pictures are available for you to attach to your email:

gmail attachment send location 4

Clicking on an image displays information about it, including its dimensions and size. You will also see a much larger preview of the image. When you are sure you have the correct image, click the ‘Open’ button as shown.

You should now be back in Gmail, looking at the message you typed to Kenneth. Down near the bottom of the form, you should also see the name of the file you have attached to the email. This is what mine looks like:

gmail attachment send location 5

Click the ‘Send’ button and that’s it. As always, Gmail will display a yellow confirmation message telling you your message has been sent.

Before I finish, a quick word about the other way of attaching a photo to an email. And yes, there is another way. It looks like this:

gmail attachment insert photo1

The difference between ‘Insert Photo’ and ‘Attach Files’

If you click the ‘Insert Photo’ button, you will be given the choice of inserting an image as an attachment or as an inline picture.

If you select the ‘Inline’ option, the image will be embedded into the body of your email message like this:

gmail attachment insert photo3

Sometimes it’s nice to embed a photo like this because it means the recipient doesn’t have to do anything but look at the email. Unfortunately, the drawbacks are that:

  • the process is not quite as straightforward as it should be, and
  • the recipient cannot easily download the image onto his/her own PC. It can be done, but not in a straightforward way.

If I ever do an Advanced Gmail how-to [shudder], I will include the ‘Inline’ function, but given the unfinished state of Gmail at the moment, I don’t see that happening any time soon.

I did not intend to review the new version of Gmail, but after a month of working on it for this series, I can honestly say I am not impressed. I had to work around certain key functions – like Contacts – because the interface was so poorly designed and/or implemented. And even the Inbox functions leave a lot to be desired. Too much is hidden, making not-so-advanced functions hard to find, hard to use and hard to explain.

In many ways, the new Gmail reminds me of Windows 8. There too, key functions were hidden, or implemented in ways that were not at all intuitive. And people hated it, myself included.

I truly believe that function should never be subordinated to form. I don’t care what something looks like so long as it works. Sadly both the new Gmail and Windows 8 placed form well and truly over function.

To be fair, I understand that mobile devices have made it necessary to simplify all applications in order to conform to the new ways of doing things, but we have not yet reached the point where serious work is done on those devices. Imagine trying to write your magnum opus on your mobile phone! Or if that’s not your style, imagine trying to create a complex spreadsheet on your phone.

Mobile devices are simply too limited for the kind of work we currently do on desktops or laptops. Therefore it does not make sense – from a user’s point of view – to reduce everything to the common denominator of the mobile device. Yet that is exactly what Windows 8 and this new Gmail are attempting to do.

As the younger generation would say – ‘Fail’

cheers

Meeks

 

 


Smashwords Book Sale – 3 for 1 Bargain

Smashwords Book Sale

For the remainder of July Smashwords has a promo on. This puts Back From Chaos as free, Through Kestrel’s Eyes at $1.00, and The Dreamt Child at $1.25. Look for the promo coupon when you click on the book page. https://www.smashwords.com/books/search

That means all three for only $2.25. Smashwords can be loaded down in many formats for various e-readers, i-pads and i-phones. Enjoy this while it lasts.

***

I’ve been meaning to round out the set and this was the perfect opportunity! Happy bargain hunting. :)

cheers

Meeks


Data Solutions Australia – my data for sale

angryI have just hung up from Data Solutions Australia, a company dedicated to providing mailing list and telemarketing list data to other companies who then use those lists to chase sales.

http://www.dsadata.com.au/contactus.aspx

I rang Data Solutions Australia because my landline is an unlisted number, yet I keep receiving unsolicited telemarketing calls on that number.

I value my privacy, otherwise I would not pay for the privilege of having an unlisted number in the first place.

I value my privacy and do not toss my private information about willy nilly.

I value my privacy, and I get mad when commercial interests use my private information against me, without my knowledge or consent.

I value my privacy and should not have to opt-out of these advertising/sales campaigns.

Data Solutions Australia promised to take my information off their database, and I intend to hold them to that.

Not happy,

Meeks


This is how handwriting with the iPen will work on the iPad Pro

acflory:

Handwriting on a tablet… hmmm….what a horrible idea. I know some writers prefer to create using pen, paper and longhand, but I’ve been typing for about 40 years, and I simply can’t write longhand anymore. It’s tiring. My hand freezes up. And the end result? Chickens could do better.
But this handwriting technology does highlight the direction of technology for the foreseeable future. Ah well…

Originally posted on RGS Computing:

This is how handwriting with the iPen will work on the iPad Pro

Penning the next Great American Novel on the iPad Pro may have just gotten easier thanks to Apple’s latest handwriting user interface patent.

If the patent becomes commercialized in future tablets, iPad Pro owners won’t have to resort to attaching third-party Bluetooth keyboards or pecking on the touchscreen keyboard. Instead, users could do it the old-fashioned way – scribbling words on the screen with their fingertips or using a stylus to ink their thoughts. It’s Apple version of the digital quill.

How it works

Like existing tablets that support handwriting – like Microsoft’s Surface 3, HP’s Pro Tablet 608 or Samsung’s Galaxy Note Pro 12.2 – Apple’s patent reveals a handwriting input area on the bottom of the screen and converted digital text would appear at the top.

The handwriting input area includes shortcuts to add a space, return, numbers and punctuations. This appears in a narrow bar just…

View original 524 more words


Boots for elephants 

acflory:

This post really made me smile. And he’s just half an hour up the road from Warrandyte too! Kinda crazy but very nice.

Originally posted on 5 minutes more please:


The Knox Leader (local paper) published this article below, on Ferntree Gully resident Joe Parsons, who has been helping elephants in need for the past 20 years.
What an inspiring man!!

BOOTS FOR ELLIES: HUNDREDS of elephants across the world have had their world made a little brighter because of the dedication of a Ferntree Gully man. Joe Parsons, who runs company Aussie Dog Products, has been making special boots for elephants in need for the past 20 years. They are made from the same material used in conveyor belts in mines, and sent to elephants all over the world, including those injured in the Boxing Day tsunami in 2004. The boots are used by elephants who have problems with their feet such as infections or ulcers, helping to ease their pain. Some have even had part of their feet blown off by landmines. The family-run business supports a number…

View original 26 more words


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